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Books Books 41 - 50 of 177 on poor maid, Born in a tempest, when my mother died, This world to me is like a lasting....  
" poor maid, Born in a tempest, when my mother died, This world to me is like a lasting storm, Whirring me from my friends. Dion. How now, Marina ? Why do you keep alone ? How chance my daughter is not with you ? Do not Consume your blood with sorrowing:... "
The Doubtful Plays of William Shakspeare - Page 35
by William Shakespeare - 1887 - 375 pages
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The Wisdom and Genius of Shakespeare: Comprising Moral Philosophy ...

William Shakespeare, Thomas Price - 1839 - 460 pages
...Which oft affects the wisest: these, Are such infirmities, that honesty Is never free of. 13i. 2. 50 This world to me is like a lasting storm, Whirring me from my friends. 33iv. 1. 51 Good stars, that were my former guides, Have empty left their orbs, and shot their fires...
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The essays of Elia, Volumes 1-2

Charles Lamb - 1840
...carpet hang upon her grave, while summer days did last. " Alas for me ! " she said, " poor unhappy maid, born in a tempest, when my mother died. This world to me is like a lasting storm, hurrying me from my friends." "How now, Marina," said the dissembling Dionysia, " do you weep alone...
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The works of Shakspere, revised from the best authorities: with a memoir and ...

William Shakespeare - 1843
...violets, and marigolds, Shall, as a chaplet, hang upon thy grave, While summer days do last. Ahme! poor maid, Born in a tempest when my mother died,...why do you keep alone : How chance my daughter is notwith you? Do not Consume your blood with sorrowing : you have A nurse of me. Lord! how у our favour'в...
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The Works of William Shakspeare: The Text Formed from an Intirely ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1843
...violets, and marigolds, Shall, as a carpet, hang upon thy grave, While summer days do last. Ah me, poor maid ! Born in a tempest, when my mother died,...from my friends. Dion. How now, Marina! why do you weep alone s ? How chance my daughter is not with you ? Do not Consume your blood with sorrowing: you...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: The Text Formed from an Entirely ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1843
...violets, and marigolds, Shall, as a carpet, hang upon thy grave, While summer days do last. Ah me, poor maid ! Born in a tempest, when my mother died,...from my friends. Dion. How now, Marina ! why do you weep alone 8 ? How chance my daughter is not with you ? Do not Consume your blood with sorrowing :...
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Shakespeare [sic] and his times: including the biography of the poet ...

Nathan Drake - English literature - 1843 - 660 pages
...violets, and madrigolds, Shall, as a chaplet, hang upon thy grave, While summer days do last Ahme! poor maid, Born in a tempest, when my mother died,...like a lasting storm, Whirring me from my friends; Act iv. sc. 1. a passage, the leading idea of which, Shakspeare has transplanted with the sann 1 pleasing...
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Shakspeare and his times

Nathan Drake - 1843 - 660 pages
...violets, and madrigolds, Shall, as a chaplct, hang upon thy grave, While summer days do last. Ah me ! poor maid, Born in a tempest, when my mother died,...like a lasting storm, Whirring me from my friends ; Act IT. e. 1. a passage, the leading idea of which, Shakspeare has transplanted with the <pleasing...
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Shakespeare [sic] and His Times: Including the Biography of the Poet ...

Nathan Drake - English literature - 1843 - 660 pages
...violets, and madrigolds, Shall, as a chaplet, hang upon thy grave, W hile summer days do last. Ah me ! poor maid, Born in a tempest, when my mother died,...like a lasting storm, Whirring me from my friends ; Act iv. sc. 1. a passage, the leading idea of which, Shakspeare has transplanted with the same pleasing...
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Remarks on mr. J. P. Collier's and mr. C. Knight's editions of Shakespeare

Alexander Dyce - 1843
...undoubtedly the genuine lection, viz.; SCENE 1.C. p. 326. " Dion. How now, Marina ! why do you weep alone ? How chance my daughter is not with you ? Do not Consume your blood with sorrowing: you have A nurse of me. Lord ! how your favour's chang'd With this unprofitable woe!" " Malone tells us...
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Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: With a Life of the Poet and ..., Volume 6

William Shakespeare - 1844
...tenderly, fondly. 8 The old copy reads: " Here she comes weeping for her onely mislresst death." Dion. How now, Marina! why do you keep alone ? How...you ? Do not Consume your blood with sorrowing; you have A nurse of me. Lord! how your favor's 8 changed With this unprofitable woe! Come, come; Give me...
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