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Books Books 11 - 20 of 20 on She trembling strove; this strife of hers, like that Which made the world, another....  
" She trembling strove; this strife of hers, like that Which made the world, another world begat Of unknown joy. "
The Works of Christopher Marlowe: With Notes and Some Account of His Life ... - Page 36
by Christopher Marlowe, Alexander Dyce - 1850
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Marlowe: A Critical Study

J. B. Steane - Authors, English - 1964 - 381 pages
...selfe, and yelded at the last. (15-16^ 289 This is developed in Hero andLeander: She trembling stroue; this strife of hers (like that Which made the world) another world begat Of unknowne ioy. Treason was in her thought, And cunningly to yeeld her selfe she sought, Seeming not...
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Christopher Marlowe

Malcolm Miles Kelsall - Social Science - 1981 - 199 pages
...philosophical passage: Love is not full of pity (as men say) But deaf and cruel where he means to prey. Even as a bird, which in our hands we wring, Forth...made the world) another world begat Of unknown joy. (II. 287-93) The deafness and the cruelty of all love, and the proximity of pain to pleasure are seen...
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Shakespeare and Elizabethan Poetry: A Study of His Earlier Work in Relation ...

M. C. Bradbrook - Drama - 1979 - 279 pages
...no changeless eternal calm, but Empedocles' warring of love and discord, the storm of atomic battle. She trembling strove, this strife of hers (like that...made the world) another world begat Of unknown joy (11. 291-292.) As a Hymn to Earthly Love and Beauty, an anti-Spenserian manifesto, Hero and Leander...
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Elizabethan Marlowe: Writing and Culture in the English Renaissance

William Zunder - Drama - 1994 - 113 pages
...in the powerful image of wringing a bird's neck in lines 289-91. 'Even as a bird', Marlowe declares: which in our hands we wring, Forth plungeth, and oft flutters with her wing, She trembling strove. (II. 289-91) But, in a further perception of contradiction, 'this strife' of Hero's, Marlowe goes on,...
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The Columbia History of British Poetry

Carl Woodring, James S. Shapiro - Literary Criticism - 2013 - 732 pages
...in slightly mocking fashion, but the consummation is set forth in cosmic terms: "this strife . . . (like that which made the world) another world begat / Of unknown joy." The poet provides two analogous digressions Neptune's attempt to woo Leander, now almost drowned,...
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The Irony of Identity: Self and Imagination in the Drama of Christopher Marlowe

Ian McAdam - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 283 pages
...give rise to aggression and violation; in Marlowe's vision it is the inescapable paradox of existence: Even as a bird, which in our hands we wring, Forth...made the world) another world begat Of unknown joy. (2.289-93) The poem recognizes the precariousness of all artistic and intellectual constructs in shaping...
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Complete Poems

Christopher Marlowe - Poetry - 2003 - 112 pages
...at his mercy was. Love is not full of pity (as men sayI But deaf and cruel where he means to prey. Even as a bird, which in our hands we wring. Forth...strove; this strife of hers (like that Which made the worldi another world begat Of unknown joy. Treason was in her thought. And cunningly to yield herself...
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The World of Christopher Marlowe

David Riggs - Biography & Autobiography - 2004 - 411 pages
...desire and strife brings the universe into being. At the Heracleitan climax of the poem, when Hero 'trembling strove; this strife of hers (like that...made the world) another world begat / Of unknown joy' (291-93). Marlowe's embrace of dialectical materialism enables him to suspend indefinitely the tragic...
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The school of night: a study in the literary relationships of Sir Walter Raleigh

Muriel Clara Bradbrook - English poetry - 1936
...should know, but not admit, what she is doing : it makes for richness of living, as Aristotle saw:17 123 She trembling strove : this strife of hers (like that...made the world) another world begat Of unknown joy. (Second Sestiad, 11. 291-3.) It is Shakespeare's doctrine of submission to the flux of living as the...
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