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Books Books 81 - 90 of 112 on Afric of the other, and so many other under-kingdoms, that the player, when he comes....  
" Afric of the other, and so many other under-kingdoms, that the player, when he comes in, must ever begin with telling where he is, or else the tale will not be conceived? Now ye shall have three ladies walk to gather flowers, and then we must believe... "
The development of the drama - Page 197
by Brander Matthews - 1916 - 350 pages
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The knight of our burning pestle

Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher - Drama - 1908 - 309 pages
...one side, and Afric of the other, and so many other under-kingdoms, that the player, when he cometh in, must ever begin with telling where he is, or else the tale will not be conceived.' 3. compasse of the Citty-wals. ' The circuit of the wall of London on the land side, to wit, from the...
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Proceedings of the Royal Philosophical Society of Glasgow, Volume 39

Royal Philosophical Society of Glasgow - Science - 1908
...Affrick of the other," said Sidney, "and so many other under Kingdoms that the player when he commeth in must ever begin with telling where he is, or else the tale will not be conceived." "What shall I say " (this is Cervantes in Don Quixote, speaking in the person of the Canon of Toledo,...
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Yale Studies in English, Volume 33

Literary Collections - 1908
...one side, and Afric of the other, and so many other under-kingdoms, that the player, when he cometh in, must ever begin with telling where he is, or else the tale will not be conceived.' 3. compasse of the Citty-wals. ' The circuit of the wall of London on the land side, to wit, from the...
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A Defence of Poesie and Poems

Philip Sidney - Poetry - 1909 - 192 pages
...where you shall have Asia of the one side, and Afric of the other, and so many other under kingdoms, that the player, when he comes in, must ever begin with telling where he is,1 or else the tale will not be conceived. Now shall you have three ladies walk to gather flowers,...
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English essays from Sir Philip Sidney to Macaulay: with introductions, notes ...

Charles William Eliot - English essays - 1910 - 421 pages
...one side, and Afric of the other, and so many other under-kingdoms, that the player, when he cometh in, must ever begin with telling where he is, or else the tale will not be conceived. Now ye shall have three ladies walk to gather flowers, and then we must believe the stage to be a garden....
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Shakespeare and the Traditions of Comedy

Leo Salingar - Drama - 1976 - 368 pages
...one side, and Africk of the other, and so many other under-kingdoms, that the Player, when he cometh in, must ever begin with telling where he is, or else the tale will not be conceived. Now ye shall have three Ladies walk to gather flowers, and then we must believe the stage to be a Garden....
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Neo-Classical Dramatic Criticism 1560-1770

Thora Burnley Jones, Bernard De Bear Nicol - Drama - 1976 - 188 pages
...you shall have Asia on the one side, and Affricke of the other, and so manie other under Kingdomes, that the Player when he comes in, must ever begin...he is, or else the tale will not be conceived. Now you shall have three Ladies walke to gather flowers, and then we must beleeve the stage to be a garden....
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The Critical Reception of Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra from 1607 to 1905

Michael Steppat - Drama - 1980 - 619 pages
...one side, and Afric of the other, and so many other unde^cingdoms, that the player, when he cometh in, must ever begin with telling where he is, or else the tale will not be conceived." Although Shakespeare's devices were more resourceful than those of some of his predecessors, his practice...
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Sir Philip Sidney: Selected Prose and Poetry

Sir Philip Sidney - Literary Criticism - 1983 - 539 pages
...where you shall have Asia of the one side, and Afric of the other, and so many other under-kingdoms, that the player, when he comes in, must ever begin...he is, or else the tale will not be conceived? Now you shall have three ladies walk to gather flowers, and then we must believe the stage to be a garden....
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Shakespeare's Universe of Discourse: Language-Games in the Comedies

Keir Elam - Drama - 1984 - 339 pages
...appearance ('the player, when he cometh in', complains Sidney of contemporary English performances, 'must ever begin with telling where he is, or else the tale will not be conceived', 1595: 134; and compare again the Mummers' play and its explicatory deictic redundancy: 'I am King Alfred...
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