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Books Books 51 - 59 of 59 on My personal identity, therefore, implies the continued existence of that indivisible....  
" My personal identity, therefore, implies the continued existence of that indivisible thing which I call myself. Whatever this self may be, it is something which thinks, and deliberates, and resolves, and acts, and suffers. "
Human Personality and Its Survival of Bodily Death - Page 11
by Frederic William Henry Myers - 1907 - 470 pages
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Making of the Modern Mind: The Surfacing of Consciousness in Social Thought

Philip Hodgkiss - Psychology - 2001 - 268 pages
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Human Personality and Its Survival of Bodily Death 1903, Part 1

F. W. H. Myers - Body, Mind & Spirit - 2003 - 732 pages
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Divine Immanence: An Essay on the Spiritual Significance of Matter, 1898

J. R. Illingworth - History - 2003 - 272 pages
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Consciousness: An Introduction

Susan J. Blackmore - Philosophy - 2004 - 460 pages
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Self-deception and Akrasia: A Comparative Conceptual Analysis

Mark Sultana - Philosophy - 2006 - 418 pages
...attributable to mere sloth or inattentiveness; this dilemma constituted a veritable stalemate at the time: "Whatever this self may be, it is something which...feeling; I am something that thinks, and acts, and 1 Note that John Locke, unlike Descartes, did not think that a 'self is a thinking substance, but only...
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Psychic Phenomena: Science and Immortality

Henry Frank - 2006 - 576 pages
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Human Nature: The Categorial Framework

P. M. S. Hacker - Philosophy - 2007 - 344 pages
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The Latest Answers to the Oldest Questions: A Philosophical Adventure with ...

Nicholas Fearn - Philosophy - 2005 - 225 pages
...at all, whether after death or even before it. In 1785, the Scottish philosopher Thomas Reid wrote: 'Whatever this self may be, it is something which...feeling; I am something that thinks, and acts, and suffers.'1 This proviso meant that anything within one's experience - anything in the world that we...
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