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Books Books 81 - 90 of 173 on And here give me leave to mention what Monsieur Boileau has so very well enlarged....  
" And here give me leave to mention what Monsieur Boileau has so very well enlarged upon in the preface to his works, that wit and fine writing doth not consist so much in advancing things that are new, as in giving things that are known an agreeable turn. "
The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq. In Verse and Prose: Containing the ... - Page 26
by Alexander Pope - 1806
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The works of Alexander Pope, Volume 2

Alexander Pope, John Wilson Croker, Whitwell Elwin, William John Courthope - 1871
...preface to his works, that wit and fine writing do not consist so much in advancing things that are now, as in giving things that are known an agreeable turn. It is impossible for us, who live in the later ages of the world, to make observation in criticism, morality,...
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The poetical works of Alexander Pope. With memoir, critical diss., and ...

Alexander Pope - 1872
...convinced of their truth and solidity. And here give me leave to mention what Monsieur Boileau has so well enlarged upon in the preface to his works that wit and fine writing doth not consist so much in advancing things that are new, as in giving things that are known an agreeable turn....
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The Civil service handbook of English literature

Henry Austin Dobson - 1874
...finished epigrammatic couplets of the critic of twenty, that ' Wit and fine Writing doth not consist so much in advancing Things that are new, as in giving Things that are known an agreeable Turn.' What, for instance, could be neater or moru skilful than the way in which these verses (some of which...
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Selections from Addison's Papers Contributed to the Spectator

Joseph Addison - Great Britain - 1875 - 528 pages
...of their truth and 30 solidity. And here give me leave to mention what Monsieur Boileau has so very well enlarged upon in the preface to his works, that wit and fine writing do not consist so much in advancing things that are new, as in giving things that are known an agreeable...
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Selections from Addison's papers contributed to the Spectator, ed. by T. Arnold

Joseph Addison - 1875
...of their truth and 30 solidity. And here give me leave to mention what Monsieur Boileau has so very well enlarged upon in the preface to his works, that wit and fins writing do not consist so much in advancing things that are new, as in giving things that are...
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Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay: With Indexes...

Quotations, English - 1876 - 764 pages
...ADD1SON : Spectator, No. 1 66. And here give me leave to mention what Monsieur Boileau has so very well enlarged upon in the preface to his works, that wit and fine writing do not consist so much in advancing things that are new, as in giving things that are known an agreeable...
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The Works of Joseph Addison: The Spectator

Joseph Addison - 1880
...very well enlarged upon in the preface to his works, [that wit and fine writing doth not consist so much in advancing things that are new, as in giving things that are known an agreeable turnTJ It is impossible for us, who live in the latter ages of the world, to make observations in criticism,...
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Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay: With Indexes. Authors, 544 ...

Samuel Austin Allibone - Quotations, English - 1880 - 752 pages
...ADDISON : Spectator, No. 1 66. And here give me leave to mention what Monsieur Boileau has so very learned, languages, and pique themselves upon their skill i line writing do not consist so much in advancing things that are new, as in giving things that are...
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The Works of Alexander Pope: Poetry

Alexander Pope, John Wilson Crocker - 1882
...has so well enlarged upon in the preface to his works: that wit and fine writing doth not consist so much in advancing things that are new, as in giving things that are known an agreeable turn. It is impossible for us who live in the latter ages of the world, to make observations in criticism, morality,...
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Scribner's Magazine, Volume 3

Edward Livermore Burlingame - 1888
...its lines,* justifying the truth of Addison's dictum, that " Wit and fine Writing doth not consist so much in advancing Things that are new as in giving Things that are known an agreeable Turn." The criticism in the Speclalor from * e.0., " And Fools rush in where Angels fear to tread.'1 which...
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