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Books Books 41 - 50 of 165 on Lo, here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his moist cabinet mounts up on high,....  
" Lo, here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his moist cabinet mounts up on high, And wakes the morning, from whose silver breast The sun ariseth in his majesty; Who doth the world so gloriously behold, That cedar-tops and hills seem burnish'd gold. "
Shakespeare [sic] and His Times: Including the Biography of the Poet ... - Page 351
by Nathan Drake - 1843 - 660 pages
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Half-hours with the best authors, selected by C. Knight

Half hours - 1847
...to west with this disgrace. SHAKSPERE. Lo ! here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his mpist cabinet mounts up on high, And wakes the morning,...majesty ; Who doth the world so gloriously behold, The cedar-tops and hills seem burnish'd gold. SHAKSPEBE. See, the day begins to break And the light...
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The British minstrel; A choice collection of modern songs. 2 pt. [in 1 vol ...

British minstrel - 1848
...thorn, and the myrtle, the bee. LO! HERE THE GENTLE LARK. Music at D'Almaine's, Soho Square. Lo I here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his moist cabinet mounts on high, And wakes the morning, from whose silver breast The sun ariseth in true majesty. THE BAY OF...
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Notes and Lectures Upon Shakespeare and Some of the Old Poets and Dramatists ...

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Sara Coleridge Coleridge - 1849
...impressing the stamp of humanity, and of human feelings, on inanimate or mere natural objects : Lo ! here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his...majesty, Who doth the world so gloriously behold, The cedar-tops and hills seem burnish'd gold. Or again, it acts by so carrying on the eye of toe reader...
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Notes and Lectures Upon Shakespeare and Some of the Old Poets and ..., Volume 1

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - English drama - 1849
...impressing the stamp of humanity, and of human feelings, on inanimate or mere natural objects : Lo ! here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his moist cabinet mounts up on high, Atid wakes the morning, from whose silver breast The sun ariseth in his majesty, Who doth the world...
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The dramatic (poetical) works of William Shakspeare; illustr., embracing a ...

William Shakespeare - 1850
...copies of copies. The mode in which each poet describes the morning will illustrate our meaning : " Lo ! here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his...cabinet mounts up on high, And wakes the morning, from whoso silver breast The sun ariscth in his majesty ; Who doth the world so gloriously behold, The cedar-tops...
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The Poetical Works of William Shakspeare

1851
...She says, " 'tis so : " they answer all, " 'tis so ; " s And would say after her if she said " no." Lo ! here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his...majesty ; Who doth the world so gloriously behold, The cedar-tops and hills seem burnished gold. Venus salutes him with this fair good-morrow : " O thou...
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The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1851
...morning in the seene before us : " Lo ! here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his moist eabinet mounts up on high, And wakes the morning, from whose...majesty; Who doth the world so gloriously behold, That eedar-tops and hills seem bumish'd gold." 41 SCENE V. "Hunting thee henee with huntsup to the day."...
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The Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 5

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens, Isaac Reed, William Hazlitt - Drama - 1852
...fantastic wits ? J She said, 'tis so : they answer all 'tis so; And would say after her if she said no. Lo ! here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his...the world so gloriously behold, That cedar- tops and bills seem burnish'd gold. Venus salutes him with this fair good morrow : " O thou clear god, and patron...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, from the text of Johnson, Stevens ...

William Shakespeare - 1852
...fantastic wits ? J Their copious stories, oftentimes begun. And would say after her if she said no. Lo ! here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his...whose silver breast The sun ariseth in his majesty; She said, 'tis so: they answer all 'tis so; That cedar-tops and hills seem burnish'd gold. Tenus salutes...
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The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere, Volume 7

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1851
...copies of copies. The mode in which each poet describes the morning will illustrate our meaning: " Lo ! here the gentle lark, weary of rest. From his...whose silver breast The sun ariseth in his majesty ; r Who doth the world so gloriously behold. The cedar-tops and hills seem bumish'd gold." We feel...
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