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Books Books 81 - 90 of 114 on Lo, here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his moist cabinet mounts up on high,....  
" Lo, here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his moist cabinet mounts up on high, And wakes the morning, from whose silver breast The sun ariseth in his majesty; Who doth the world so gloriously behold, That cedar-tops and hills seem burnish'd gold. "
Shakespeare [sic] and His Times: Including the Biography of the Poet ... - Page 351
by Nathan Drake - 1843 - 660 pages
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Poetry of the Fields: Passages from the Poets Descriptive of Pastoral Scenes ...

Nature in literature - 1864 - 128 pages
...God's holy way, I try to walk always, with Christ for my friend. ML I 'i ,•• \N. THE LAKK. Lo, hear the gentle Lark, weary of rest, From his moist cabinet...silver breast The sun ariseth in his majesty ; Who does the world so gloriously behold, The cedar tops and hills seem burnished gold. SHAKSPEAEE. THE...
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The works of Shakespeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare, Sir John Gilbert, Edward Dalziel, George Dalziel - Drama - 1864
...fantastic wits I She says, "Tie so :" they answeraU.'^. .' And would say after her, if she said "Ko.1 wn on me would beget opinion [Wound» his arm. Of my more fierce endeavour: higL And wakes the morning, from whose surer bfThe sun ariseth in his majesty ; Who doth the world...
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Bygone Warwickshire

William Andrews - Warwickshire (England) - 1893 - 284 pages
...heaven's gate sings," and then, " Lo ! here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his moist-cabinet mounts up on high, And wakes the morning, from whose...behold, That cedar tops and hills seem burnish'd gold." Mr. JR Wise, who knows the whole of the country surrounding Stratford with a thorough knowledge, and...
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The Works of Shakesspeare

...rest, From his moist cabinet mounts up on high, And wakes the morning, from whose silver breast 855 The sun ariseth in his majesty; Who doth the world so gloriously behold That cedar-tops and hills seem burnished gold. Venus salutes him with this fair good~morrow: 'O thou clear...
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The Poems: Venus and Adonis, The Rape of Lucrece, The Phoenix and the Turtle ...

William Shakespeare - Literary Criticism - 1992 - 301 pages
This is a fully annotated edition of all the poems which are now generally regarded as Shakespeare's, excluding The Sonnets. It contains Venus and Adonis, The Rape of Lucrece ...
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The Poems and Sonnets of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 1994 - 197 pages
...Tis so:' they answer all, ' Tis so;' And would say after her, if she said 'No.' Lo, here the gende lark, weary of rest, From his moist cabinet mounts...majesty; Who doth the world so gloriously behold, That cedar-tops and hills seem burnisht gold. Venus salutes him with this fair good-morrow: 'O thou clear...
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Birds in Literature

Leonard Lutwack - Literary Collections - 1994 - 286 pages
...natural objects."4 Coleridge chose a passage from Shakespeare's Venus and Adonis to illustrate his point: Lo! here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his...whose silver breast The sun ariseth in his majesty, (lines 853-56) John Ruskin was also interested in the exercise of the imagination on natural objects,...
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Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves

Peter Erickson - Literary Criticism - 1991 - 228 pages
Participants in the current debate about the literary canon generally separate the established literary order of which Shakespeare is the most visible icon from the emergent ...
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Metre, Rhythm and Verse Form

Philip Hobsbaum - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 196 pages
...stanza of four lines with an added couplet. Shakespeare used it for his romantic poem Venus and Adonis: Lo, here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his...wakes the morning, from whose silver breast The sun arises in his majesty; Who doth the world so gloriously behold That cedar-tops and hills seem burnished...
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Metre, Rhythm and Verse Form

Philip Hobsbaum - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 196 pages
...four lines with an added couplet. Shakespeare used it for his romantic poem Venus and Adonis: L o, here the gentle lark, weary of rest, From his moist...wakes the morning, from whose silver breast The sun arises in his majesty; Who doth the world so gloriously behold That cedar-tops and hills seem burnished...
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