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" For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and... "
Life and correspondence of David Hume - Page 76
by John Hill Burton - 1846
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Theory of Thought and Knowledge

Borden Parker Bowne - Knowledge, Theory of - 1897 - 389 pages
...my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade,...pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without ^/^v^ ^ a perception, and never can observe anything but the per- c < "*!" ception. . . . If any one,...
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A Manual of Ethics

John Stuart Mackenzie - Ethics - 1897 - 471 pages
...section vi.) : "When I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure" ; and he consequently concludes that the self or personality is "nothing but a bundle or collection...
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The Problems of Philosophy: An Introduction to the Study of Philosophy

John Grier Hibben - Philosophy - 1898 - 203 pages
...my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other of heat or cold, light or shade,...any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception. When my perceptions are removed for any time, as by sound sleep, so long...
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The Problems of Philosophy: An Introduction to the Study of Philosophy

John Grier Hibben - Philosophy - 1898 - 203 pages
...my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other of heat or cold, light or shade,...love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myielf at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception. When my...
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Theism in the Light of Present Science and Philosophy

James Iverach - Religion and science - 1899 - 330 pages
...my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other of heat or cold, light or shade,...any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception. When my perceptions are removed for any time, as by sound sleep, so long...
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Scottish Philosophy in Its National Development

Henry Laurie - Philosophers - 1902 - 344 pages
...he says, " when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade,...any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception." That he can never catch himself without a perception is true enough ;...
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Ultimate conceptions of faith

George Angier Gordon - Theology, Doctrinal - 1903 - 399 pages
...persistent, and confident attack of negative opinion. So much must be put to its credit. Hume writes : " I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception." 1 How could Hume catch himself when he was trying to catch something...
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ULTIMATE CONCEPTIONS OF FAITH

G. A. GORDON - 1903
...persistent, and confident attack of negative opinion. So much must be put to its credit. Hume writes : " I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception." l How could Hume catch himself when he was trying to catch something...
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A literary history of Scotland

John Hepburn Millar - English literature - 1903 - 703 pages
...intimately," he says, " into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular conception or other. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception." Hence he concludes that the rest of mankind are " but a bundle of different...
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Descartes, Spinoza and the New Philosophy

James Iverach - 1904 - 245 pages
...my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade,...any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception. When my perceptions are removed for any time, as by sound sleep ; so long...
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