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Books Books 21 - 30 of 192 on If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me, Without my stir. Ban. New....  
" If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me, Without my stir. Ban. New honours come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest... "
A Few Notes on Shakespeare - Page 119
by Alexander Dyce - 1853 - 156 pages
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The Eclectic Review, Volume 12; Volume 30

William Hendry Stowell - Literary Criticism - 1819
.... ;,u,, , • 'iğ---Ğ1ğ ' Macbeth. Act 1, Scene Sk -' 1, :M •-..-! ..." to •• - 'MACBETH. Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. - ;..•• •••ğ 4 •' This passage secius corrupt. An hour is a space of time, therefore tautology....
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: To which are Added His ...

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1821
...come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour$ runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour || : — My dull brain was...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare: With the Corrections ..., Volume 11

William Shakespeare, James Boswell, Edmond Malone, Samuel Johnson, Alexander Pope, Mr. Theobald (Lewis), William Warburton, Sir Thomas Hanmer, Edward Capell, George Steevens, Isaac Reed - 1821
...come upon him Lake our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. MACB. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day 7. Shakspeare has somewhat like this sentiment in The Merchant of Venice : " Where, every something...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the corrected copies ...

William Shakespeare - 1823
...come upon him Like our strange garments; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. 5 Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour 6 : — my dull brain was...
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Letters on miscellaneous and domestic subjects [by B. Oakley].

Benjamin Oakley - 1823 - 384 pages
...wrinkles come; And let my liver rather cool with wine, Than my heart cool with mortifying groans!" " Let come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day!" Why not make your mind up to come and pass a month here ? We buy excellent asparagus for ninepence...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, in Ten Volumes: All's well that ...

William Shakespeare, Isaac Reed, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - 1823
...come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.* Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your-leisure. Macb. Give me your favour : — my dull brain was wrought...
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The Phrenological Journal and Miscellany, Volume 1

Phrenology - 1824
...stir. And at last he resolves to leave things to their course, and to be guided by circumstances : Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. In the next scene, temptations gather around Macbeth, when the king declares his purpose of visiting...
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The British Theatre: Or, A Collection of Plays, which are Acted at ..., Volume 5

Mrs. Inchbald - English drama - 1824
...come upon him, Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour : — my dull brain was wrought...
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The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare, Part 1

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1824 - 830 pages
...come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mquld, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ! Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. nan. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour! — my dull brain was wrought...
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Miscellaneous pieces

Samuel Johnson, Arthur Murphy - Literary Criticism - 1825
...Shakespeare for an individual, in opposition to a commonwealth, or conjunct body of men. NOTE VHI. Macbeth. Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. I suppose every reader is disgusted at the tautology in this passage, lime and the hour, and will,...
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