Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 31 - 40 of 189 on If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me, Without my stir. Ban. New....  
" If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me, Without my stir. Ban. New honours come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest... "
A Few Notes on Shakespeare - Page 119
by Alexander Dyce - 1853 - 156 pages
Full view - About this book

The works of Samuel Johnson [ed. by F.P. Walesby].

Samuel Johnson - 1825
...Shakespeare for an individual, in opposition to a commonwealth, or conjunct body of men. NOTE Vlll. Macbeth. Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. I suppose every reader is disgusted at the tautology in this passage, lime and the hour, and will,...
Full view - About this book

The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D..: Miscellaneous pieces

Samuel Johnson, Arthur Murphy, Francis Pearson Walesby - 1825
...Shakespeare for an individual, in opposition to a commonwealth, or conjunct body of men. NOTE VIII. Macbeth. Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. I suppose every reader is disgusted at the tautology in this passage, time and the hour, and will,...
Full view - About this book

Floral Emblems

Henry Phillips - Emblems - 1825 - 352 pages
...lines its leaf." Cowper. This rapid growing tree stands as the symbol of Time in floral language. f " Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day." Shakspeare. TIMIDITY. MARVEL OF PERU.—MirabiHs. " Solitaire amante des nuits, Pourquoi ces timides...
Full view - About this book

The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, with notes original and selected ...

William Shakespeare - 1843
...come upon him Like our strange garments; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour 29 :—my dull brain was...
Full view - About this book

The Life and Times of Frederick Reynolds, Volume 1

Frederick Reynolds - 1826
...lords, and not absolutely afoot amongst wits." CHAPTER. XL ADVENTURES, ACCIDENTS, AND ANECDOTES. " Come what, come may, " Time, and the hour runs through the roughest day." SHAKSPEARE. DURING the summer of 17S9, 1 visited Topham, at his villa, called Cowslip Hall, situated...
Full view - About this book

The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text by G. Steevens and E ...

William Shakespeare - 1826
...come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. 5 Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour 6 : — my dull brain was...
Full view - About this book

Plays of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1826 - 960 pages
...come upon him Like our strange garments; cleava not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. ds To the strict deputy ; bid herself assay him ; I have great h dcj. San. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Mm I:. Give me your favour : — my dull brain...
Full view - About this book

The London encyclopaedia: or, Universal dictionary of science ..., Volume 22

Thomas Curtis - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1829
...cries. id. A pack of sorrows, which would press you down. If unprcvented, to your timeless grave. Id. Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Shatapeare. Scandal, the suppliants for the people, call them Timtpleascrt, flatterers, foes to nobleness....
Full view - About this book

The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare, William Harness - Drama - 1830
...come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day." Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour:8 — my dull brain was wrought*...
Full view - About this book

The plays and poems of William Shakespeare: accurately printed from the text ...

William Shakespeare - 1833 - 1064 pages
...come upon him Like our strange garments; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. a W 2 3 7) Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour: — 3S) my dull brain...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF