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Books Books 71 - 80 of 176 on If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me, Without my stir. Ban. New....  
" If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me, Without my stir. Ban. New honours come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest... "
A Few Notes on Shakespeare - Page 119
by Alexander Dyce - 1853 - 156 pages
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A Collection of Familiar Quotations: With Complete Indices of Authors and ...

John Bartlett - Quotations - 1856 - 358 pages
...swelling act Of the imperial theme. Act i. Sc. 3. Present fears Are less than horrible imaginings. Act i. Sc. 3. Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Macbeth — Continued. Act i. Sc. 4. Nothing in his life Became him like the leaving it. Act i. Sc....
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LECTURES ON ENGLISH HISTORY AND TRAGIC POETRY

HENRY REED - 1856
...stir." He clings to the temptation, but seeks to commit himself to the uncontrollable tide of fate : " Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day." This is the only time the thought enters into the mind of Macbeth, of trusting exclusively to the power...
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The works of William Shakspere. Knight's Cabinet ed., with additional notes

William Shakespeare - 1856
...come upon him, Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour : — My dull brain was wrought...
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The works of William Shakespeare, Volume 5

William Shakespeare, Alexander Dyce - Drama - 1857
...upon him, Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould But with the aid of use. Macb. [aside] Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour : — my dull brain was wrought...
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The Complete Works of Shakspeare, Revised from the Best ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1857
...honors come upon him Like our strange garments; cleave not to their mould But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macl). Give me your favor : my dull brain was wrought...
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La Collerica: comedietta in un atto

1857
...come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. MAC. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. BAN, Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. MAC. Give me your favour: — my dull brain was wrought...
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Shakspearian Reader: A Collection of the Most Approved Plays of Shakspeare ...

William Shakespeare - 1857 - 469 pages
...come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favor : — my dull brain was wrought...
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Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems, Volume 5

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1858
...come upon him, Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour * : my dull brain was wrought...
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The United Presbyterian magazine

1859
...Without my stir." looking at the difficulties which lay between him and the object of his rations, — " Come what, come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day." ‘ther he whispered the secret made known to him, or began to concoct iures for accomplishing the destiny,...
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The Plays of Shakespeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1860
...him. Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould But with the aid of use. Млев. [Aside.] D D D F D D D D;G E D D D D E E D D D D D D D G G G G G D G D G G G G ВАЛ. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. MACB. Give me your favour : — • My dull brain...
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