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Books Books 11 - 20 of 21 on Every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is FELT, acutely or obscurely,....  
" Every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is FELT, acutely or obscurely, the moment it occurs. If the reader has never paid attention to this matter, he will be both interested and astonished to learn how many different local bodily feelings... "
The Principles of Psychology - Page 450
by William James - 1918 - 704 pages
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Bulletin of the Massachusetts Commission on Mental Diseases, Volume 1

Medical - 1917
...indefinitely numerous and subtle that the entire organism may be called a sounding board." "Every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is felt acutely or obscurely the moment it occurs." "If we fancy some strong emotion, and then try to abstract from our consciousness of it all feelings of...
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Bulletin of the Massachusetts Commission on Mental ..., Volume 1, Issues 1-2

Massachusetts. Dept. of Mental Health, George Milton Kline, Elmer Ernest Southard - Mental illness - 1917
...indefinitely numerous and subtle that the entire organism may be called a sounding board." "Every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is felt acutely or obscurely the moment it occurs." "If we fancy s.ome strong emotion, and then try to abstract from our consciousness of it all feelings of...
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Collected Essays and Reviews

William James - Física - Investigación - Discursos, ensayos, conferencias - 1920 - 516 pages
...instigating cause is apt to be rather "hollow." The next thing to be noticed is this, that every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is felt,...to learn how many different local bodily feelings lie can detect in himself as characteristic of his various emotional moods. It would be perhaps too...
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The Autonomic Functions and the Personality

Edward John Kempf - Nervous system - 1921 - 156 pages
...of the exciting fact, and our feeling of the same changes as they occur is the emotion." " Every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is FELT, acutely or obscurely, the moment it occurs." The fact that bodily changes occur directly following a perception and this change is felt as the emotion...
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William James: His Life and Thought

Gerald Eugene Myers - Biography & Autobiography - 2001 - 628 pages
...experience an extraordinary variety of bodily changes occurs, and James believed that ' 'every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is felt,...as characteristic of his various emotional moods. "2 3 The opportunities are enormous for introspectively discovering or clarifying the physiological...
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Emotions in Asian Thought: A Dialogue in Comparative Philosophy, With a ...

Joel Marks, Roger T. Ames, Robert C. Solomon - History - 1995 - 321 pages
...behavioral changes, such as crying, trembling, and striking, as emotions or feelings, for "every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is felt, acutely or obscurely, the moment it occurs" (James and Lange 1967, 16). These more overt manifestations of emotion are feelings for the same reason...
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Existentialist Ontology and Human Consciousness

William Leon McBride - Philosophy - 1997 - 374 pages
...but include visceral changes lpulse rate, perspiration, gastro-inteslinal activityl, and "every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is FELT, acutely or obscurely, the moment it occurs" fp. 450-451l. 8 An emotion is then more a reflex-like awareness of bodily changes than a voluntary...
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Emotion: A Comprehensive Phenomenology of Theories and Their Meaning for Therapy

James Hillman - Psychology - 1960 - 318 pages
...fact, and that our feeling of the same changes as they occur is the emotion (p. 449). . . . every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is FELT, acutely or obscurely, the moment it occurs (pp. 450-1). But when James says: 'Now the general causes of the emotions are indubitably physiological'...
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Contemporary Psychology, Volume 17

Guido Villa - Philosophy - 2004 - 416 pages
...strike, or tremble, because we are sorry, angry, or fearful, as the case may be." l For " every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is felt, acutely or obscurely, the moment it occurs." So that the most important points to be considered in an emotion are these somatic phenomena, which...
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Describing Inner Experience?: Proponent Meets Skeptic

Russell T. Hurlburt, Eric Schwitzgebel - Consciousness - 2007
...William James, for example, writes that "every one of the bodily changes [associated with emotion], whatsoever it be, is FELT, acutely or obscurely, the moment it occurs... . Our whole cubic capacity is sensibly alive; and each morsel of it contributes its pulsations of feeling,...
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