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Books Books 91 - 100 of 155 on Methinks I should know you, and know this man; Yet I am doubtful; for I am mainly....  
" Methinks I should know you, and know this man; Yet I am doubtful; for I am mainly ignorant What place this is; and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me; For (as I am a man)... "
The works of Shakespeare: in eight volumes - Page 101
by William Shakespeare, Mr. Theobald (Lewis) - 1767
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Bi-cultural Critical Essays on Shakespeare

Joo-Hyon Kim - Drama - 1994 - 126 pages
...from heaven to comfort a poor soul! She is a light shining in the darkness. Finally Lear whispers, "as I am a man, I think this lady/ To be my child Cordelia."4) Now his sight is restored; he can clearly see that she is indeed "most rich, being poor;/...
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Selected Poems

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 1995 - 128 pages
...this is; and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me; For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia. Be your tears wet? Yes, faith. I pray weep not. If you have poison for me, I will drink it. I know...
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Reading Shakespeare on Stage

Herbert R. Coursen - Drama - 1995 - 298 pages
...Cordelia after their capture. The progress of this Lear culminated when he turned to Kent and said, "Do not laugh at me; / For as I am a man, I think this lady / To be my child, Cordelia." Only by being who Nightingale said he was at the outset, could Cox have made this Lear as vulnerable...
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Shakespeare, the King's Playwright: Theater in the Stuart Court, 1603-1613

Alvin B. Kernan - Drama - 1997 - 230 pages
...because he forgives and seeks forgiveness; because he identifies himself with the human community—"as I am a man I think this lady To be my child Cordelia" (4.7.68). Shakespeare's monarchical state endures not because of some mysterious hierarchy-seeking...
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The Century, Volume 26

1883
...witness an actual restoration from the jaws of death to life. And the climax, reached in the words, " Do not laugh at me ; For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia" — is as subdued, as low in tone, and as real as had been the preparation for it. Nothing can be more...
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King Lear

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1999 - 142 pages
...have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me; 70 For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia. CORDELIA And so I am! I am! LEAR Be your tears wet? Yes, faith. I pray weep not. If you have poison...
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Shakespeare and Gender

Stephen Orgel, Sean Keilen - Drama - 1999 - 338 pages
...properly expressive and has left the constraint of patriarchal forms behind. He greets Cordelia with "... as I am a man, I think this lady / To be my child Cordelia" (IV. vii. 71-72); she is both lady and child, he both man and father, and in his bewildered conflation...
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King Lear

William Shakespeare - Performing Arts - 1908 - 503 pages
...this is. and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments, nor I know not Where I did lodge last night Do not laugh at me; For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia. Cor. And so I am : I am. 70 Lear. Be your tears wet ? yes, faith. I pray, weep not 61,62. Fourscore, ..plainly}...
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Shakespeare: The Basics

Sean McEvoy - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 282 pages
...is, and all the skill I have 65 Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me. For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia. (IV 7 58-69) It may be worth checking two words against the notes at the bottom of the page in the...
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The Oxford Shakespeare: The History of King Lear : The 1608 Quarto: The 1608 ...

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2000 - 300 pages
...have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me, 65 For as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child, Cordelia. CORDELIA And so I am . LEAR Be your tears wet? Yes, faith. I pray, weep not. If you have poison for...
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