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Books Books 11 - 20 of 180 on And thus still doing, thus he passed along. Duch. Alas, poor Richard ! where rode....  
" And thus still doing, thus he passed along. Duch. Alas, poor Richard ! where rode he the whilst ? York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious... "
The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the corrected copy ... - Page 195
by William Shakespeare - 1805
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Characters of Shakespear's Plays

William Hazlitt - 1817 - 352 pages
...prattle to be tedious: Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard; no mail cried God save him! No joyful tongue gave him his...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him." HENRY IV. IN TWO PARTS. IF Shakespear's fondness for the ludicrous sometimes led to faults in his tragedies...
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Elements of criticism [by H. Home].

Henry Home (lord Kames.) - 1817
...to be tedious: Even so, or with much more contempt, mens' eyes Did scowl on Richard; no man cry'd s God save him: No joyful tongue gave him his welcome...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. Richard IT. Act v. Sc. 2. Northumberland. How doth my son and brother? Thou tremblest, and the whiteness...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 88

Literary Criticism - 1860
...his prattle to be tedious : Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eres Did scowl on frit-hard ; no man cried, God save him ; No joyful tongue gave...patience, That had not God, for some strong purpose, stecl'd The hearts of men, they must perforce have melted, And barbarism itself hare pitied him." It...
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Characters of Shakespear's plays

William Hazlitt - 1818
...thus he pasa'd along. Duchess. Alas, poor Richard ! where rides he the while ? York, As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves...have melted, And barbarism itself have. pitied him." HENRY IV. IN TWO PARTS. IF Shakespear's fondness for the ludicrous sometimes led to faults in his tragedies...
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Characters of Shakespeare's Plays

William Hazlitt - Drama - 1818 - 323 pages
...stage, Are idly bent on hrm that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious : Even so, or wilh much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him." 16 HENRY IV. IN TWO PARTS. IF Shakspeare's fondness for the ludicrous sometimes led to faults in his...
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The History of England: Related in Familiar Conversations, by a ..., Volume 1

Elizabeth Helme - Great Britain - 1818
...reception of the fallen Richard." Charles continued. " men's eyes Did scowl on Richard : no man cry'd God save him .' No joyful tongue gave him his welcome...his grief and patience) That had not God for some strange purpose steel'd The hearts of men, they must perforce have melted ; And barbarism itself have...
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Elements of Criticism

Lord Henry Home Kames - Criticism - 1819
...to be tedious; Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard : no man cry'd God save him ! No joyful tongue gave him his welcome...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. Richard 11. ActV. Sc. 3. Northumberland. How doth my son and brother ? Thou tremblest, and the whiteness...
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The Plays of Shakspeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens, Isaac Reed - Drama - 1819
...eyes Did scowl on Richard ; no man cried, God save him; No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home r But dust was thrown upon his sacred head ; Which with...men, they must perforce have melted, And barbarism itstlf have pitied him. But hi «ven hath a hand in these event« ; To whose high will we bound our...
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Lessons in Elocution: Or, A Selection of Pieces, in Prose and Verse, for the ...

William Scott, John Walker, James Burgh - Elocution - 1820 - 407 pages
...eyes Did scowl OH Richard. No man cri'd, God save him ! Jin joyful tongue gave him bis welcome hr.ie : But dust was thrown upon his sacred head : Which,...and patience ;) That had not God, for some strong puipose s'.eel'd The heart? of men, they must peiiorce riave meited ; . And barbarism itself have pitied...
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The Works of John Dryden: Now First Collected in Eighteen Volumes, Volume 6

John Dryden - 1821
...to be tedious ; Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard ; no man cry'd, God save him : No joyful tongue gave him his welcome...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. To speak justly of this whole matter : it is neither height of thought that is discommended, nor pathetic...
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