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Books Books 91 - 100 of 143 on Alas! sir, are you here? things that love night love not such nights as these; the....  
" Alas! sir, are you here? things that love night love not such nights as these; the wrathful skies gallow the very wanderers of the dark, and make them keep their caves. Since I was man such sheets of fire, such bursts of horrid thunder, such groans of... "
The beauties of Shakespear: regularly selected from each play, with ... - Page 122
by William Shakespeare - 1752
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Hamlet and Other Shakespearean Essays

Lionel Charles Knights - Drama - 1979 - 308 pages
...or punishment according to desert, and their human assumptions are often projected on to 'the gods'. Let the great Gods, That keep this dreadful pudder o'er our heads, Find out their enemies now. Tremble, thou wretch, That hast within thee undivulged crimes, Unwhipp'd...
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Madness in Literature

Lillian Feder - Literary Criticism - 1983 - 352 pages
...dwell on its symbolic meaning; it will serve to expose "man's nature" in all its cruelty and hypocrisy: Let the great Gods, That keep this dreadful pudder o'er our heads, Find out their enemies now. (in, ii, 49-51) His concern with justice here, and later in m, iv, vi,...
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Sovereign Shame: A Study of King Lear

William F. Zak - Drama - 1984 - 210 pages
...exactly than his speech in act 3, scene 2, calling down a judgment of the heavens upon the wicked. Let the great gods, That keep this dreadful pudder o'er our heads, Find out their enemies now. Tremble, thou wretch That hast within thee undivulged crimes Unwhipt of...
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The Heroic Idiom of Shakespearean Tragedy

James C. Bulman - Literary Criticism - 1985 - 254 pages
...beyond the more generalized railing of traditional revengers and makes them as satiric as Timon's: Let the great gods, That keep this dreadful pudder o'er our heads, Find out their enemies now. Tremble, thou wretch, That hast within thee undivulged crimes, Unwhipp'd...
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King Lear and the Gods

William R. Elton - 1980 - 299 pages
...thought-executing fires" (II1.ii.1, 4), just as Kent's choral commentary, Such sheets of fire, such bursts of horrid thunder, Such groans of roaring wind and rain, I never Remember to have heard . . . , (III.0.46-48) reemerges at the same third-act point in Shadwell's play, where the Captain observes:...
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Ideological Approaches to Shakespeare: The Practice of Theory

Robert P. Merrix, Nicholas Ranson - Literary Criticism - 1992 - 289 pages
...elements for Lear are also the couriers or ministers of the gods, and a few lines later he declares: Let the great Gods, That keep this dreadful pudder o'er our heads, Find out their enemies now. (3.2.49-51) He runs through a list of wretches who attempt to hide their...
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Shakespeare, Harsnett, and the Devils of Denham

Frank Walsh Brownlow - Literary Criticism - 1993 - 440 pages
...Shakespeare, on the other hand, presents his storm as an exorcism, with King Lear as its interpreter: Let the great gods, That keep this dreadful pudder o'er our heads, Find out their enemies now. Tremble, thou wretch That hast within thee undivulged crimes Unwhipt of...
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King Lear

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1994 - 145 pages
...The wrathful skies And make them keep their caves. Since I was man, Such sheets of fire, such bursts of horrid thunder, Such groans of roaring wind and...Remember to have heard. Man's nature cannot carry Th'affliction nor the fear. LEAR Let the great gods, That keep this dreadful pudder o'er our heads,...
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Elsie's Children, Book 5

Martha Finley - Juvenile Fiction - 1994 - 340 pages
...make our arrangements," added her mother. CHAPTER TWENTY-SECOND. * Such sheets of fire, such bursts of horrid thunder? Such groans of roaring wind and rain, I never Remember to have heard." SHAKESPEARE. EARLY in the morning of a perfect June day, our numerous party arrived at the wharf...
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Shakespeare the Playwright: A Companion to the Complete Tragedies, Histories ...

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 1996 - 865 pages
...man in the face of overwhelming odds. For the first time Lear is prepared to deal with his errors: Let the great gods. That keep this dreadful pudder o'er our heads. Find out their enemies now . . . I am a rnun More sinn'd against than sinning. (III. ii, 49-51, 59-60)...
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