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Books Books 51 - 60 of 80 on Taking the whole earth, instead of this island, emigration would of course be excluded;....  
" Taking the whole earth, instead of this island, emigration would of course be excluded; and, supposing the present population equal to a thousand millions, the human species would increase as the numbers 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, and subsistence... "
The Literary Magazine, and American Register - Page 361
edited by - 1804
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Parallel Chapters from the First and Second Editions of An Essay on the ...

Thomas Robert Malthus - Population - 1894 - 134 pages
...etc. In two centuries and a quarter the population would be to the means of subsistence as 512 to 10; in three centuries, as 4096 to 13 ; and in two thousand...years the difference would be almost incalculable, though the produce in that time would have increased to an immense extent. No limits whatever are placed...
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Descriptive Economics: An Introduction to Economic Science

Louis L. Williams, Fernando E. Rogers - Economics - 1895 - 248 pages
...were correct, the number of the people on the face of the earth would soon exceed the supply of food. In two centuries the population would be to the means of subsistence as 256 is to 9, and long before that time people would be starving to death. For instance, in the United States,...
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The Ridpath Library of Universal Literature ...: A Biographical ..., Volume 16

John Clark Ridpath - Literature - 1898
...the numbers i, 2,4,8, 16,32, 64, 128, 256; and the subsistence as 1,2,3, 4, Si 6, 7, BI 9. So that in two centuries the population would be to the means...of subsistence as 256 to 9 ; in three centuries as 4,096 to 13 ; and in two thousand years the difference would be almost incalculable. In this supposition...
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Beyond the Black Ocean

Thomas McGrady - Socialism and Christianity - 1901 - 304 pages
...increase as the numbers, i, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, and subsistence as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. In two centuries the population would be to the means of subsistence as 256 is to 9, and in three centuries as 4,096 is to 13. The theory of wages advanced by Mitheim maintains...
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The Collected Works of William Hazlitt: A reply to Malthus. The spirit of ...

William Hazlitt - 1902
...128, 256, and subsistence as s, 2, 3,4, 6, 7, 8, 9. In two centuries the population would be to the me of subsistence as 256 to 9 ; in three centuries as 4096 to 13, and two thousand years, the difference would be almost incalculable. ' In this supposition no limits whatever...
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Principles of Political Economy

Charles Gide - Economics - 1902 - 592 pages
...elapse between two consecutive terms of these progressions. Thence he concluded that " at the end of two centuries, the population would be to the means of subsistence as 256 are to 9 ; at the end of three centuries, as 4906 to 13 ; and after 2000 years, the difference would...
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The Ridpath Library of Universal Literature: A Biographical and ..., Volume 16

John Clark Ridpath - Literature - 1903
...numbers i, 2,4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256 ; and the subsistence as i, 2,3, 4, Si 6, 7, 8, 9. So that in two centuries the population would be to the means...of subsistence as 256 to 9 ; in three centuries as 4,096 to 13 ; and in two thousand years the difference would be almost incalculable. In this supposition...
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Principles of Political Economy

Charles Gide - Economics - 1903 - 705 pages
...the population could be doubled Malthus estimated as twenty-five years. He therefore concluded that : "In two centuries the population would be to the means of subsistence as 2o6 to 9 ; in three centuries it would be as 4006 to 13 ; and in two thousand years the difference...
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Current economic problems: a series of readings in the control of industrial ...

Walton Hale Hamilton - Economics - 1916 - 789 pages
...and subsistence as 1,2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. In two centuries the population would be to the m«ans of subsistence as 256 to 9 ; in three centuries as...years the difference would be almost incalculable. assignable quantity; yet still the power of population, being in every period so much greater, the...
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Malthus: 'An Essay on the Principle of Population'

T. R. Malthus - History - 1992 - 392 pages
...would increase as the numbers I, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, and subsistence as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. In two centuries the population would be to...years the difference would be almost incalculable. 15 [The concluding paragraphs of this chapter are based on pp. 22-6 of the 1798 Essay.] In this supposition...
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