Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 71 - 80 of 80 on A shelter from life-wearing cares is something : but a temple typifies higher things....  
" A shelter from life-wearing cares is something : but a temple typifies higher things — more than what we shall eat and what we shall drink, and wherewithal we shall be clothed. "
The American Woman's Home: Or, Principles of Domestic Science: Being a Guide ... - Page 231
by Catharine Esther Beecher, Harriet Beecher Stowe - 1869 - 500 pages
Full view - About this book

The Rise of the Working-class

Algernon Sidney Crapsey - Families - 1914 - 380 pages
...of those who have the mastery of production and distribution. These men of the market decide for us what we shall eat and what we shall drink and wherewithal we shall be clothed. They are our real rulers and unless we have some mastery over them, we must of necessity be their slaves....
Full view - About this book

A Grammar of Belief: A Revaluation of the Bases of Christian Belief in the ...

Charles Lemuel Dibble - Apologetics - 1922 - 208 pages
...ten, but within a future indefinitely expanded ; we will relegate to its proper place the question of what we shall eat and what we shall drink and wherewithal we shall be clothed. NOTE ON THE MEANING OF THE WORDS DOGMA AND DOCTRINE. Strictly speaking these words are not synonymous....
Full view - About this book

The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 32

American literature - 1873
...A shelter from lifewearing cares is something ; but a temple typifies higher things, — more than what we shall eat and what we shall drink, and wherewithal we shall be clothed. Rapp's disciples had bought these too dearly, —at expense of heart and soul. They purchased them...
Full view - About this book

Susanna Wesley : The Complete Writings: The Complete Writings

Susanna Wesley - Religion - 1997 - 528 pages
...[ing] When the thoughts are too much upon the things of this world, and we are too inquisitive after "what we shall eat and what we shall drink and wherewithal we shall be clothed . . . for, since our heavenly Father knoweth that we have need of these things," 17 and his omnipotent...
Limited preview - About this book

The American Woman's Home

Catharine Esther Beecher, Harriet Beecher Stowe - Family & Relationships - 2002 - 388 pages
...the day or the week, for all these duties. If there be not, let the least important be stricken trom the list, as not being duties, and therefore to be...dressing, and household furniture and ornaments, take tar too large a place in the estimate of relative importance; and it is probable that most women could...
Limited preview - About this book

A Taste for War: The Culinary History of the Blue and the Gray

William C. Davis - History - 2003 - 226 pages
...farms. As Wilbur Fisk told his family, "we soldiers often have but little else to think of, except what we shall eat and what we shall drink and wherewithal we shall get our rations."54 His was a universal concern, and never more so than when the soldiers were on the...
Limited preview - About this book

Gunfight at Mussel Slough: Evolution of a Western Myth

Terry Beers - Fiction - 2004 - 309 pages
...constant, crushing weight of care which comes from the ever-present necessity of taking thought as to what we shall eat, and what we shall drink, and wherewithal we shall be clothed? I believe it will come; I know that it is entirely possible. When good-byes had been said, John Parsons...
Limited preview - About this book

The Scottish Congressional Magazine

Andrew Elliot - 1874
...Account for it as we may, the world believes that the money question is a chief one with ministers. That "what we shall eat, and what we shall drink, and wherewithal we shall be clothed," is as much an engrossing question with us as it is with them. Whereever this is true the glory has...
Full view - About this book

The Commons, Volume 9

Graham Taylor - Social sciences - 1904
...a noble issue. In seeking first the kingdom of God and risking with the soldier's cheerful courage, what we shall eat and what we shall drink and wherewithal we shall be clothed — in hazarding, that is to say, our livelihood, our position, our prospects and all other objects...
Full view - About this book

The Paradox of the World: Sermons by John Oman, Part 4

John Oman - Presbyterian Church - 1921 - 292 pages
...rivalry, the old driving of the weak to the wall, the old round of trivial distractions, the old care for what we shall eat and what we shall drink and wherewithal we shall be clothed, the old marrying and giving in marriage for every reason except love and mutual esteem, the old measuring...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF