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Books Books 81 - 90 of 184 on He commanded where he spoke; and had his judges angry, and pleased, at his devotion.....  
" He commanded where he spoke; and had his judges angry, and pleased, at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power. The feare of every man that heard him was lest "
'Brief Lives': A-H - Page 68
by John Aubrey, Andrew Clark - 1898
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The English nation; or, A history of England in the lives of Englishmen

George Godfrey Cunningham - 1863
...applied to him the compliment passed by Ben Jonson on Lord Verulam :" He commanded when he spoke; he had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power; and the fear of every man that heard him was lest he should come to an end.'" In general politics,...
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A compendium of English literature: chronologically arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - English literature - 1865 - 776 pages
...but consisted of his own graces. His. hearers could not cough, or look aside from him, without loss. He commanded where he spoke; and had his judges angry...No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was, lest he should make an end. My conceit of his person was never...
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The Works of Lord Macaulay, Complete: Critical and historical essays

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - Law - 1866
...speech bn* consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry...No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end." From the mention which is made of...
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The works of lord Macaulay, complete, ed. by lady Trevelyan, Volume 6

Thomas Babington Macaulay (baron.) - 1866
...speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry...No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end." From the mention which is made of...
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Records of noble lives

William Henry Davenport Adams - Biography - 1867 - 349 pages
...speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion [that is, at his will]. No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard...
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The Christian ambassador, ed. by C.C. McKechnie

Colin Campbell M'Kechnie - 1868
...its own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded when he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at...No man had their affections more in his power: the fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end." With what determination Elizabeth...
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'Many happy returns of the day!' By C. and M.C. Clarke

Charles Cowden Clarke, Mary Victoria Cowden Clarke - 1869
...speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry...No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him, was, lest he should make an end.' But even should William's rank...
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A harmony of the essays, etc. of Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon, Edward Arber - Biography & Autobiography - 1871 - 584 pages
...graces. His hearers could not cough, or looke aside from him, without losse. Hee commanded where hee spoke, and had his Judges angry, and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affection mure in his power. The feare of every man that heard him, was, lest hee should make an end."/....
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A harmony of the essays, etc. of Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon, William Rawley - Biography & Autobiography - 1871 - 584 pages
...graces. His hearers could not cough, or looke aside from him, without losse. Hee commanded where hee spoke, and had his Judges angry, and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affection more in his power. The feare of every man that heard him, was, lest hee should make an end."^....
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A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - English literature - 1872 - 776 pages
...but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him, without loss. He commanded where he spoke ; and had his judges angry...No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was, lest he should make an end. My conceit of his person was never...
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