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Books Books 81 - 90 of 182 on True eloquence, indeed, does not consist in speech. It cannot be brought from far.....  
" True eloquence, indeed, does not consist in speech. It cannot be brought from far. Labor and learning may toil for it; but they will toil in vain. Words and phrases may be marshalled in every way ; but they cannot compass it. It must exist in the man,... "
American Oratory: Or Selections from the Speeches of Eminent Americans - Page 490
1836 - 531 pages
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The National Fourth Reader: Containing a Course of Instruction in Elocution ...

Richard Green Parker, James Madison Watson - Readers, American - 1861 - 432 pages
...eloquence, indeed, does not consist in speech. It can not be brought from far. Labor and learning may toil for it, but they will toil in vain. Words and phrases may be marshaled in every way, but they can not compass8 it. It must exist in the man, in the subject, and...
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The fifth reader of the School and family series

Marcius Willson - Nature - 1861 - 538 pages
...eloquence, indeed, does not consist in speech. It can not be brought from far. Labor and learning may toil for it', but they will toil in vain*. Words and phrases may be marshaled in every way', but they can not compass' it. It must exist in the man\ in the subject', and...
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A Digest of English Grammar: Synthetical and Analytical

L. T. Covell - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1861
...is to the sons of men." " Hatred stirreth up strife ; but love covcreth all sin." " True eloquence must exist in the man ; in the subject; and* in the occasion." " The sun is the source of light; the fixed stars are other suns ; the planets are other worlds ; the...
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A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - English literature - 1862 - 776 pages
...Truc eloquence does not consist in speech. It cannot be brought from far. .Labor and learning may toil for it, but they will toil in vain. Words and phrases...Affected passion, intense expression, the pomp of deelamation, all may aspire after it, they cannot reach it. It comes, if it come at all, like the...
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The Fifth Reader of the School and Family Series

Marcius Willson - Readers - 1862 - 538 pages
...it', but they will toil in vain'. Words and phrases may be marshaled in every way', but they can not compass' it. It must exist in the man', in the subject',...of declamation', all may aspire after it' they can not reach' it. It comes, if it come at all, like the outbreaking of a fountain from the earth,...
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The National Quarterly Review, Volumes 5-6

1862
...outburst of emotion. It springs from deep feeling, and the occasion must bring it forth; as Webster says, "It must exist in the man, in the subject, and in the occasion." It is the sum-total of all the faculties and powers; the whole man is needed to give it force and expression....
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The Universalist Quarterly and General Review, Volume 20

Universalism - 1863
...eloquence, indeed, does not consist in speech. It cannot be brought from far. Labor and learning may toil for it, but they will toil in vain. Words and phrases may be marshalled in every way, but they connot compass it. It must exist in the man, in the subject, and in the occasion. Webster. MANY...
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The Universalist Quarterly and General Review, Volume 20

Universalism - 1863
...eloquence, indeed, does not consist in speech. It cannot be brought from far. Labor and learning may toil for it, but they will toil in vain. Words and phrases may be marshalled in every way, hut they connot compass it. It must exist in the man, in the subject, and in the occasion. Webster....
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Public Speaking and Debate: With an Essay on Sacred Eloquence by Henry ...

George Jacob Holyoake - Debates and debating - 1863 - 234 pages
...far. Labor and learning may toil for it ; but they toil in vain. Words and phrases may be marshaled in every way ; but they cannot compass it. It must exist in the man, in the subject, in the occasion. Affected passion, intense expression, the pomp of declamation, all may aspire after...
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The National Quarterly Review, Volume 6

Edward Isidore Sears, David Allyn Gorton, Charles H. Woodman - 1863
...from far. Labor and learning may toil for it, but they will toil in vain. Word.-' and phrases may he marshalled in every way, but they cannot compass it. It must exist hi the man, in the subject, and in the occasion. Affected passion, intense expression, the pomp of...
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