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Books Books 11 - 20 of 21 on I am of anything that, in myself, the stream of thinking (which I recognize emphatically....  
" I am of anything that, in myself, the stream of thinking (which I recognize emphatically as a phenomenon) is only a careless name for what, when scrutinized, reveals itself to consist chiefly of the stream of my breathing. The 'I think' which Kant said... "
Essays in Radical Empiricism - Page 37
by William James - 1922 - 282 pages
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Twelve Great Philosophers: A Historical Introduction to Human Nature

Wayne P. Pomerleau - Philosophy - 1997 - 473 pages
...experience it, is always associated with bodily processes. "The 'I think' which Kant said must be able to accompany all my objects, is the 'I breathe' which actually does accompany them." As James points out, the word "spirit" etymologically means "breath." So, the idea of consciousness...
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The Cambridge Companion to William James

Ruth Anna Putnam - Philosophy - 1997 - 406 pages
...James writes at the end of Does Consciousness Exist? "The 'I think' which Kant said must be able to accompany all my objects, is the 'I breathe' which actually does accompany them." (Though, not to be forgotten, he acknowledges that thinking does go on.) This phenomenology comes closest...
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Close Listening: Poetry and the Performed Word

Charles Bernstein - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 390 pages
...itself to consist chiefly of the stream of my breathing. The 'I think' which Kant said must be able to accompany all my objects, is the 'I breathe' which actually does accompany them." After this strident, anti-Cartesian stance James continues and revises Bergson's stream of consciousness...
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Objectivity and Insight

Mark Sacks - 2000 - 346 pages
...itself to consist chiefly of the stream of my breathing. The 'I think' which Kant said must be able to accompany all my objects, is the 'I breathe' which...as the latter is subject to immediate perception; but breath, which was ever the original 'spirit', breath moving outwards, between the glottis and the...
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Primal Roots of American Philosophy: Pragmatism, Phenomenology, and Native ...

Bruce Wilshire - Philosophy - 2010
...radical empiricist essay "Does Consciousness Exist?": "The 'I think' which Kant said must be able to accompany all my objects, is the 'I breathe' which actually does accompany them." But James really thinks our breathing is essential to both our being and our thinking (when we do think)....
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The Logic of the Cultural Sciences: Five Studies

Ernst Cassirer - Philosophy - 2000 - 134 pages
...itself to consist chiefly of the stream of my breathing. The 'I think' which Kant said must be able to accompany all my objects is the 'I breathe' which actually does accompany them."15* Thus, from the standpoint of a strict empiricism, which is concerned solely with establishing...
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Prior to Meaning: The Protosemantic and Poetics

Steve McCaffery - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 338 pages
...itself to consist chiefly of the stream of my breathing. The 'I think' which Kant said must be able to accompany all my objects, is the 'I breathe' which actually does accompany them." James continues, revisioning Bergson's stream of consciousness as a respiratory stream. "There are...
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A Life Composed: T.S. Eliot and the Morals of Modernism

André Schüller - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 352 pages
...Descartes-based ratio into a body-related phenomenon: "The 'I think' which Kant said must be able to accompany all my objects, is the 'I breathe' which actually does accompany them","7 and Bergson, grounding his philosophy in the new biological mode of science, even derided...
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Essays in Radical Empiricism

William James - Mathematics - 2003 - 149 pages
...itself to consist chiefly of the stream of my breathing. The "I think" which Kant said must be able to accompany all my objects, is the "I breathe" which...adjustments, etc., of which I have said a word in my larger Psychologyl, and these increase the assets of "consciousness." so far as the latter is subject to immediate...
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Affective Communities: Anticolonial Thought, Fin-de-Siècle Radicalism, and ...

Leela Gandhi - History - 2006 - 254 pages
...respectability preserved in Kantian thought for reason alone: "The 'I think' which Kant said must be able to accompany all my objects, is the 'I breathe' which actually does accompany them . . . thoughts in the concrete are made of the same stuff as things are."57 Any philosophy that thus...
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