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Books Books 21 - 30 of 192 on Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper, void of all characters,....  
" Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper, void of all characters, without any ideas ; how comes it to be furnished ? Whence comes it by that vast store which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it, with an almost endless... "
The Monist - Page 149
by Edward C. Hegeler - 1906
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Elements of psychology: included in a critical examination of Locke's Essay ...

Victor Cousin - Psychology - 1838 - 423 pages
...the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it, with an almost endless variety ? Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge ? To this I answer, in one word, from experience; in that all our knowledge is founded, and from that it ultimately derives itself." Experience, then, this is...
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A Discourse of the Baconian Philosophy

Samuel Tyler - 1844 - 178 pages
...which the busy and bouiulle-s fancy of man has painted on it with almost endless variety? Where has it all the materials of reason and knowledge? To this I answer, in one word, from experience; in that all our knowledge is founded, and from that it ultimately derives itself. Our observation em-- ployed...
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The Christian Messenger and Reformer, Volume 8

James Wallis - Churches of Christ - 1844
...paper — void of all characters, without any ideas : How comes it to be furnished ? Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge ? To this I answer in one word, from experience and observation. This, when employed about external sensible objects, we may call sensation. By this...
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An essay concerning human understanding. With the notes and illustr. of the ...

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1849 - 564 pages
...the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it, with an almost endless variety ? Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge? To this I answer, in one word, From experience: in that all our knowledge is founded, and from that it ultimately derives itself. Our observation, employed...
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The Church of England sunday school quarterly magazine

Religion - 1850
...the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it, with an almost endless variety ? Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge ? To this I answer, in a word, from experience. In that аБ our knowledge is founded ; and from that it ultimately derives...
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Geschichte Der Philosophie, Volume 11

Heinrich Ritter - Philosophy - 1852
...SBegriffe fommt ibm ju« 1) lb. IV, 7>Í6i 9. 2) Ib. II, 1, Ь - .--•: 3) Ib. H, l, 2. Whence has it (sc. the mind) all the materials of reason and knowledge?...To this I answer, in one •word, from experience. Our observation employed either about external sensible objects, or about the internal operations of...
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Geschichte der christlichen Philosophie, Volume 7

August Heinrich Ritter - Philosophy - 1852
...unferer S5egriffe fommt ibm ju< 1) Ib. IV, 7, 6; 9. 2) Ib. II, l, 1. 3) Ib. II, l, 2. Whence has it (sc. the mind) all the materials of reason and knowledge? To this I answer, in one word, from experience. — — Our observation employed cither about external sensible objects, or about the internal operations...
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Course of the history of modern philosophy, tr. by O.W. Wight

Claude Henri Victor Cousin - 1852
...the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it, with an almost endless variety ? Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge ? To this I answer, in one word, from experience ; in that all our knowledge is founded, and from that it ultimately derives itself." Let us see what Locke understands...
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Locke's Essay on the Human Understanding

JOHN MURRAY - 1852
...the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it, with an almost endless variety ? Whence has it all the materials of Reason and Knowledge? To this I answer, in one word—from EXPERIENCE: in that all our Knowledge is founded, and from that it ultimately derives itself....
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Geschichte der Philosophie, Volume 11

Heinrich Ritter - Philosophy - 1852
...lb. IV, 7, 6; 9. 2) Ib. II, 1, 1. 3) Ib. Il, 1, 2. Whence bas il (se. tbe mind) all (he пкterials of reason and knowledge? To this I answer, in one word, from experience. — — Our observation employed either about external sensible objects, or about the infernal operations...
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