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Books Books 41 - 50 of 195 on The finch, the sparrow, and the lark, The plain-song cuckoo gray, Whose note full....  
" The finch, the sparrow, and the lark, The plain-song cuckoo gray, Whose note full many a man doth mark, And dares not answer, nay... "
An Introduction to Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream - Page 78
by James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps - 1841 - 104 pages
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The Universal Songster: Or, Museum of Mirth: Forming the Most ..., Volume 1

Ballads, English - 1834
...saws, in slumbei lie. THE OUSEL COCK. (Shakspeare.) THE ousel cock, so black of hue, With orange-tawney bill, The throstle with his note so true, The wren...quill : The finch, the sparrow, and the lark. The plain song-cuckoo gray, Whose note full many a man doth mark, And dare not answer nay. v PLATO'S ADVICE....
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Midsummer-night's dream. Love's labor's lost. Merchant of Venice. As you ...

William Shakespeare, Charles Symmons, John Payne Collier - 1836
...they can. I will walk up and down here, and I will sing, that they shall hear I am not afraid. [Sings. The ousel-cock, so black of hue, With orange-tawny...with his note so true, The wren with little quill. Tita. What angel wakes me from my flowery bed ? [ Waking. Bot. The/inch, the sparrow, and the lark,...
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La musa madrigalesca; or, A collection of madrigals, ballets, roundelays &c ...

Musa - 1837
..." a word of fear " Unpleasing to a married ear." Love's Labour's Lost. And again he is called " the Cuckoo gray, " Whose note full many a man doth mark, " And dares not answer nay." Midsummer Night's Dream. As the writer, however, has not informed us why the Cuckoo should bear the...
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The complete works of William Shakspeare, with notes by the most emiinent ...

William Shakespeare - 1838
...that they shall hear 1 am not afraid. (Sings,) The ousel-cock, so black of hue, Jf'ith oranye-taitinj e found remarkably distinct. To this life and variety of character, ; Tita. What angel wakes me from mv flowery bed? (Watimg.) Bot. The finch, the sparrow, and the /ant,...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 2

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, Isaac Reed, Nicholas Rowe, George Steevens - Drama - 1839 - 537 pages
...walk up and down here, and I will sing, that they shall hear I am not afraid. [Sings. The oiuel-cock,4 so black of hue, With, orange-tawny bill, The throstle...with his note so true, The wren with little quill ; Tito. What angel wakes me from my flowery bed ? [Waking Bot. The finch, the sparrow, and the lark....
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: Midsummer-night's dream. Love's ...

William Shakespeare, Charles Symmons, John Payne Collier - 1839
...they can. I will walk up and down here, and I will sing, that they shall hear I am not afraid. [Sings. The ousel-cock, so black of hue, With orange-tawny bill, The throstle with his note so true, The ivren with little quill. Tita. What angel wakes me from my flowery bed ? [ Waking. Bot. The finch,...
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Temptation; or, A wife's perils [by C.L. Gascoigne].

Caroline Leigh Gascoigne - 1839
...with a book amongst the woods which surrounded her secluded home ; now and then pausing to listen to " The throstle, with his note so true, The wren, with little quill ," or to watch the growth of the flowers she had cultivated with so much care ; or to visit the cottages...
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Observations on Popular Antiquities: Chiefly Illustrating the ..., Volume 2

John Brand, Sir Henry Ellis - Christian antiquities - 1841
...and in all other countries it is used in the same reproachful sense : ' The plain song Cuckoo grey, Whose Note full many a Man doth mark, And dares not answer nay.' Shaksp. " The reproach seems to arise from this Wrd making use of the hed or nest of another to deposit...
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The First Sketch of Shakespeare's Merry Wives of Windsor

William Shakespeare - Falstaff, John, Sir (Fictitious character) - 1842 - 141 pages
...more they're beaten, the better still they be." ACT. III. Sc. 1. " Hot. Why do they run away? this is a knavery of them, to make me afeard. Re-enter...bill ; The throstle with his note so true ; The wreti with little quill ; " The finch, the sparrow, and the lark ; The plain-song cuckoo gray, Whose...
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