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Books Books 31 - 39 of 39 on Having considered it attentively, I regret to find in it nothing of that sincerity....  
" Having considered it attentively, I regret to find in it nothing of that sincerity and delicacy which you profess to value. Political opposition can never absolve gentlemen from the necessity of a rigid adherence to the laws of honour and the rules of... "
A General History of the Burr Family: With a Genealogical Record from 1193 ... - Page 85
by Charles Burr Todd - 1902 - 600 pages
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The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 16

History - 1865
...correspondence with Hamilton just before the challenge that led to the duel, said, " Political opposition can never absolve gentlemen from the necessity of...neither claim such privilege, nor indulge it in others." This has been called affectation ; but we have no doubt that Burr uttered the truth in the sentences...
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The Papers of Alexander Hamilton: May 1, 1802-October 23, 1804, additional ...

Alexander Hamilton - Biography & Autobiography - 1979 - 921 pages
...1804. 2. Burr to H, June 21, 1804. From Aaron Burr 1 Nyork 2 1 June 1 804 Sir Political opposition can never absolve Gentlemen from the necessity of...honor and the rules of decorum: I neither claim such priviledge nor indulge it in others. The Common sense of Mankind affixes to the epithet adopted by...
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Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Future of America

Thomas J. Fleming - History - 1999 - 446 pages
Describes the events that led up to the fatal duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, offers profiles of each man, and recounts Jefferson's attempts to ruin Burr after ...
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Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic

Joanne B. Freeman - History - 2002 - 376 pages
...neither gentlemen nor leaders. As Burr warned Hamilton during their negotiations, "Political opposition can never absolve Gentlemen from the necessity of a rigid adherence to the laws of honor and the a1les of decorum." A true gentleman avoided crossing lines but knew how to behave if lines were crossed....
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Aaron Burr: The Rise and Fall of an American Politician

Buckner F. Melton - Juvenile Nonfiction - 2004 - 112 pages
...Hamilton had insulted Burr, so he "Political opposition," Burr wrote to Hamilton on lune 2(, (804, 'can never absolve gentlemen from the necessity of...adherence to the laws of honor and the rules of decorum." In his correspondence with Hamilton. Burr echoed the words of the dueling code, and Hamilton would...
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Jefferson's Second Revolution: The Election of 1800 and the Triumph of ...

Susan Dunn - History - 2004 - 372 pages
...Nor would Burr retreat. Hamilton's response neither satisfied nor placated him. "Political opposition can never absolve Gentlemen from the necessity of...adherence to the laws of honor and the rules of decorum," Burr informed his nemesis. Although many men recognized such "laws of honor," one can only smile at...
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The Devil's Advocates: Greatest Closing Arguments in Criminal Law

Michael S Lief, H. Mitchell Caldwell - Law - 2006 - 436 pages
Documents eight key trials involving such subjects as a confessed rapist who was not read his Miranda rights, a congressman's controversial use of a temporary insanity defense ...
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Fallen Founder: The Life of Aaron Burr

Nancy Isenberg - Biography & Autobiography - 2007 - 540 pages
...remarks were acceptable to use against a political rival. As Burr neatly stated: "Political opposition can never absolve Gentlemen from the necessity of...adherence to the laws of honor and the rules of decorum." With a bow to republicanism, he added, "I neither claim such a privilege nor indulge it in others."...
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The Balance, and Columbian Repository, Volume 3

Ezra Sampson, George Chittenden, Harry Croswell - Hudson (N.Y.) - 1804
...delicacy which you prolefs to value. Puliiical oppofition can never abfo've gentlemen from the nec^ffity of a. rigid adherence to the laws of honor, and the rules of decorum. I neither claim fuch privilege nor indulge it in others. The common fenfe of mankind affixes to the epithet adopted...
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