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Books Books 81 - 90 of 121 on Egyptian strainers and channels, and came to him not without some tincture of the....  
" Egyptian strainers and channels, and came to him not without some tincture of the learning, or some cast of the models of those before him. The poetry of Shakspeare was inspiration indeed : he is not so much an imitator as an instrument of nature ; and... "
Memoirs of the Life of William Shakespeare: With an Essay Toward the ... - Page 209
by Richard Grant White - 1866 - 425 pages
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The Praise of Shakespeare: An English Anthology

English literature - 1904 - 342 pages
...tincture of the learning, or some cast of the models, of those before him. The poetry of Shakespeare was inspiration indeed ; he is not so much an imitator...Nature : and it is not so just to say that he speaks from her, as that she speaks through him. His characters are so much Nature herself, that 'tis a sort...
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Anglia, Volume 28

Comparative linguistics - 1905
...of nature .... the poetry of Shakspeare was Inspiration indeed ; be is not so much au Imitator äs an instrument, of nature; and it is not so just to say that he speaks from her, äs that she speaks through him .... The power over our passions was never possessed in a...
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Shakespeare

Sir Walter Alexander Raleigh - Dramatists, English - 1907 - 233 pages
...is elaborated and heightened. It gives Pope his happiest sentence : " The Poetry of Shakespeare was Inspiration indeed : he is not so much an Imitator, as an Instrument, of Nature ; and 'tis not so just to say that he speaks from her, as that she speaks thro' him." Johnson repeats the...
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MRS. MONTAGU

R. HUCHON - 1907
...dramatist stands 1 Eighteenth Century Essays on Shakespeare^ pp. 9-15, 19-20. above par, even above Homer: "he is not so much an imitator as an instrument of nature''; his characters it would be "an injury " to call mere copies : each of them is as much an individual...
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680-1638

Charles Wells Moulton - American literature - 1910
...tincture of the learning, or some cast of the models, of those before him. The poetry of Shakespear was inspiration indeed ; he is not so much an imitator...Nature ; and it is not so just to say that he speaks from her, as that she speaks through him. His characters are so much Nature herself, that 'tis a sort...
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readings in english prose of the eighteenth century

raymond macdonald alden - 1911
...tincture of the learning, or some cast of the models, of those before him. The poetry of Shakespeare was inspiration indeed: he is not so much an imitator, as an instrument, of Nature; and 'tis not so just to say that he speaks from her, as that she speaks through him. His characters are...
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Readings in English Prose of the Eighteenth Century

Raymond Macdonald Alden - English prose literature - 1911 - 724 pages
...tincture of the learning, or some cast of the models, of those before him. The poetry of Shakespeare was inspiration indeed: he is not so much an imitator, as an instrument, of Nature; and 'tis not so just to say that he speaks from her, as that she speaks through him. His^characters.ar£.aoumuch...
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The New Grant White Shakespeare: The Comedies, Histories ..., Volume 18

William Shakespeare, William Peterfield Trent, Benjamin Willis Wells, John Bell Henneman - 1912
...scruples when they came to account for all the admiration of which they themselves and their labours were living witnesses. True, one of them, himself...and monstrous, in this bewitching, but untutored and half savage child of nature. Yet, at this very time, the intelligent love of Shakespeare was so deeply...
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Shakespeare After Three Hundred Years

John William Mackail - 1916 - 22 pages
...to be afraid of admiration.' Yet Pope himself says of him, in words no less true than noble, that ' he is not so much an imitator as an instrument of nature, and 'tis not so just to say he speaks from her, as that she spoke through him.' Upon the enthusiasm of...
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The Mirror and the Lamp: Romantic Theory and the Critical Tradition

Meyer Howard Abrams - Social Science - 1971 - 406 pages
...tincture of the learning, or some cast of the models, of those before him. The poetry of Shakespear was inspiration indeed: he is not so much an Imitator, as an Instrument of Nature; and 'tis not so just to say he speaks from her, as that she speaks through him. To these ideas, Pope joins...
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