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Books Books 11 - 15 of 15 on In comedies the greatest skill is this, rightly to touch All things to the quick....  
" In comedies the greatest skill is this, rightly to touch All things to the quick ; and eke to frame each person so, That by his common talk you may his nature rightly know : A roister ought not preach, that were too strange to hear, But as from virtue... "
Elizabethan Drama, 1558-1642: A History of the Drama in England from the ... - Page 113
by Felix Emmanuel Schelling - 1908 - 1291 pages
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Shakespeare's Universe of Discourse: Language-Games in the Comedies

Keir Elam - Drama - 1984 - 339 pages
...extends the fictional character-inferred-fromspeech principle to (Elizabethan) comedy and its decorum: In comedies the greatest skill is this, rightly to...That by his common talk you may his nature rightly know(see Bradbrook 1955: 49]. Nor was the creation of the dramatic ethos without its own practical...
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Sources of Dramatic Theory: Volume 1, Plato to Congreve

Michael J. Sidnell - Drama - 1991 - 317 pages
...worshipful audience, thus much I dare avouch: In comedies the greatest skill is this: rightly to touch AH things to the quick, and eke to frame each person...by his common talk you may his nature rightly know, A roisterft ought not preach, that were too strange to hear, But as from virtue he doth swerve, so...
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The English Stage: A History of Drama and Performance

J. L. Styan - Drama - 1996 - 432 pages
...what I was going to say to you! MIRABELL. I thank you heartily, heartily. The decorum of speech is 'to frame each person so / That by his common talk you may his nature rightly know' (Richard Edwards, Damon and Pithias, (1571)). Congreve's choice of words permits his audience to anatomize...
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Elizabethan Popular Theatre: Plays in Performance

Michael Hattaway - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 234 pages
...prologue to this play an important description of this aspect of the playwright's and player's art: In comedies, the greatest skill is this: rightly to...by his common talk you may his nature rightly know: A roister ought not preach, that were too strange to hear, But as from virtue he doth swerve so ought...
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The Cambridge Introduction to Early English Theatre

Janette Dillon - Drama - 2006 - 296 pages
...in observing 'decorum' (Prologue, line 26): rightly to touch All things to the quick and eke [also] to frame each person so That by his common talk you may his nature rightly know. The old man is sober, the young man rash, the lover triumphing in joys, The matron grave, the harlot...
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