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Books Books 11 - 20 of 135 on Martial law, which is built upon no settled principles, but is entirely arbitrary....  
" Martial law, which is built upon no settled principles, but is entirely arbitrary in its decisions, is, as Sir Matthew Hale observes, in truth and reality no law, but something indulged rather than allowed as a law. The necessity of order and discipline... "
Military law - Page 49
by William Winthrop - 1886
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The History of the Common Law of England: And An Analysis of the Civil Part ...

Sir Matthew Hale - Civil law - 1820 - 472 pages
...martial law, these tilings are to be observed (a),viz. First, that in truth and reality it is not a law, but something indulged, rather than allowed, as a law. The necessity of government, order, and discipline, in an army, is that only which can give those laws a countenance;—quod...
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Encyclopaedia Britannica: Or, A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and ..., Volume 14

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1823
...distemper of the state, and not as any part of the permanent and perpetual laws of the kingdom^ For martial law, which is built upon no settled principles,...decisions, is, as Sir Matthew Hale observes, in truth and.reality no law, but .something indulged rather than allowed as a law. The necessity of order and...
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The Missionary Smith: Substance of the Debate in the House of Commons on ...

Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons - Slavery - 1824 - 255 pages
...highest and most venerable authority known to our law. " Martial law," says Sir Matthew Hale, " is not a law, but something indulged, rather than allowed, as a law. The necessity of government, order, and discipline in an army, is that only which can give it countenance. Necessitas...
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Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books, Volume 3

Sir William Blackstone, Sir John Taylor Coleridge - Law - 1825
...distemper of the state, and not as any part of the permanent and perpetual laws of the kingdom. For martial law, which is built upon no settled principles, but is entirely arbitrary in it's decisions, is, as sir Matthew Hale observes q , in truth and reality no law, but something indulged,...
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Commentaries on the laws of England. [Another]

William Blackstone (sir.) - 1825
...distemper of the state, and not as any part of the permanent and perpetual laws of the kingdom. For martial law, which is built upon no settled principles, but is entirely arbitrary in it's decisions, is, as sir Matthew Hale observes q , in truth and reality no law, but something indulged,...
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The Parliamentary Debates, Volume 11

Great Britain. Parliament, Thomas Curson Hansard - Great Britain - 1825
...and most venerable authority known to our law. “Martial law,” says sir Matthew Hale, “is not a law, but something indulged, rather than allowed, as a law. The necessity of go. vernment, order, and discipline in an army, is that only which can give it coun¿ tenance. ‘Necessitas,...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of science, art ...

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington)
...the state, and not as any part of the permanent and perpetual laws. Martial law has been said to be, in truth and reality, no law, but something indulged rather than allowed as a law. The petition of right, 3 Car. I., enacted that no soldier shall be quartered on the subject without his...
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The Law Magazine, Or, Quarterly Review of Jurisprudence

Law - 1835
...principles, and entirely arbitrary in its nature; and actually quotes Sir Matthew Hale to prove " that it is in truth and reality no law, but something indulged, rather than allowed as law," forgetting that what might perhaps be said with some truth by Sir Matthew Hale, who died many...
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Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books ; with an ..., Volume 2

Sir William Blackstone, John Eykyn Hovenden, Archer Ryland - Law - 1836
...distemper of the state, and not as any part of the permanent and perpetual laws of the kingdom. For martial law, which is built upon no settled principles,...in its decisions, is, as Sir Matthew Hale observes (r), in truth and reality no law, but something indulged rather than allowed as a law. The necessity...
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The rise and progress of the English Constitution: the treatise of J. L. de ...

Jean Louis de Lolme - Law - 1838 - 1139 pages
...law, being then built upon no settled principles, Martial law. was, as Sir Matthew Hale observes 5 , in truth and reality no law, but something indulged, rather than allowed as a law. It had only been legally exercised during the continuance of a rebellion, and when in force, any person...
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