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" His violent prejudice against our West Indian and American settlers appeared whenever there was an opportunity. Towards the conclusion of his " Taxation no Tyranny," he says, " how is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of... "
History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Aix-la-Chaoelle ... - Page 70
by Philip Henry Stanhope (5th earl.) - 1836
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John Wesley: A Biography

Stephen Tomkins - Biography & Autobiography - 2003 - 208 pages
...They called for liberty, but already had as much as most English people and, anyway, 'How is it dial we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of negroes?' Wesley read it, fell for it and plagiarized it. He edited it into a pamphlet entitled A Calm Address...
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The Victorians

A. N. Wilson - History - 2003 - 760 pages
...the next insurrection of negro slaves in the West Indies.' (Of the Americans in 1777, he had asked, 'How is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of negroes?') The same paradox which Tory Johnson had observed in the 1770s was on glaring display in the 1860s. Those...
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Runaway and Freed Missouri Slaves and Those who Helped Them, 1763-1865

Harriet C. Frazier - Social Science - 2004 - 214 pages
...others. Dr. Johnson's pithy remarks in 1777 on slaveholding American patriots capture this paradox: "How is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of negroes?" Johnson continued his opposition to slavery by observing, "An individual may, indeed, forfeit his liberty...
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Samuel Johnson

Timothy Wilson-Smith - Biography & Autobiography - 2004 - 160 pages
...colonists. However, his hatred of hypocrisy led him to make one shrewd hit at the American patriotic case. How is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of negroes?"* Johnson hated the institution of slavery and he knew that almost none of the American leaders attacked...
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Liberty and Freedom: A Visual History of America's Founding Ideas

David Hackett Fischer - History - 2005 - 851 pages
...and gave it a new purpose that it had not possessed before. SLAVERY DEFENDED Liberty for Slaveholders How is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of negroes? DR. SAMUEL JOHNSON, 1775 IN THE YEAR 1852, 3. Louisiana cotton farmer named Edwin Epps hired a...
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The Cambridge Companion to English Literature, 1740-1830

Thomas Keymer, Jon Mee - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 308 pages
...justice that the leaders of American society wanted to consolidate their own slave-owning ascendancy ('how is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of negroes?'),'6 and providing a thoughtful disquisition on the nature of nations and nationalism by comparing...
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The Pocket Book of Patriotism

Jonathan Foreman - History - 2005 - 96 pages
...WILLIAM PRESCOTT 3775 US population reaches 2.5 million 1775 Samuel Johnson's Taxation no Tyranny: "How is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of Negroes?" 1776 The Declaration of Independence: 1776 Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations 1776 Edward Gibbon's...
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The Pursuit of Happiness in Times of War

Carl M. Cannon - History - 2005 - 331 pages
...noticed this internal contradiction among the southern gentlemen as early as 1775, dryly observing, "How is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of Negroes?" As to the nature of the issue that caused the rift between North and South, neither Lincoln nor his...
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The Brooklyn Bridge: A Cultural History

Richard Haw - History - 2005 - 307 pages
...War, the idea of American freedom had often seemed somewhat hollow. As Samuel Johnson famously asked, "how is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of Negroes?" 17 For foreign observers, the Civil War seemed to consign the contradictions of freedom and slavery...
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And the War Came: The Slavery Quarrel and the American Civil War

Donald J. Meyers - History - 2005 - 284 pages
...dissolution of the United States. In England, author Samuel Johnson posed a barb that was difficult to avoid: "How is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of negroes?" 34 34. Davis, The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution, p.275. 2. UNITING AROUND A CONSTITUTION,...
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