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Books Books 11 - 20 of 189 on Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained....  
" Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained in the same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because... "
Principles of Logic - Page 418
by George Hayward Joyce - 1916 - 431 pages
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Philosophical Works, Volume 4

David Hume - Philosophy - 1854
...same manner ; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible, because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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The Essentials of Philosophy: Wherein Its Constituent Principles are Traced ...

George Jamieson - Philosophy - 1859 - 260 pages
...contrary of any demonstrable conclusion in mathematics. Hume says no ! and gives an illustration. " That the sun will not rise to-morrow, is no less intelligible...contradiction, than the affirmation that it will rise." Indeed ! Then it would be equally plausible to say, that two and three will not make five to-morrow,...
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Kant's Kritik der reinen Vernunft: in ihrem Verhältniss zur Kritik der Sprache

Siegmund Levy - 1868 - 31 pages
...same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible, because it can never imply a contradiction. All reasonings concerning matter of fact seem to be founded on the relation of Cause and Effect. By...
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Causality: Or, the Philosophy of Law Investigated

George Jamieson - Causation - 1872 - 368 pages
...contrary of any demonstrable conclusion in mathematics. Hume says no ! and gives an illustration. " That the sun will not rise to-morrow, is no less intelligible...contradiction, than the affirmation that it will rise." Indeed ! Then it would be equally plausible to say, that two and three will not make five to-morrow,...
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The Principles of Psychology: Special analysis, general analysis, corollaries

Herbert Spencer - Psychology - 1872
...sam« manner ; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible, because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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The Principles of Psychology, Volume 2

Herbert Spencer - Psychology - 1873
...conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to reality. That the sun will not rise to-morrow, is no less intelligible...contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise. \Ve sheuld in vain, therefore, attempt to demonstrate its falseheod. Were it demonstratively false,...
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The Principles of Psychology, Volume 2

Herbert Spencer - Psychology - 1873
...mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to reality. That the sun u'itt not rise to-morrow, is no less intelligible a proposition,...contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise. We should in vain, therefore, attempt to demonstrate its falsehood. Were it demonstratively false,...
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The Principles of psychology, Volume 2

Herbert Spencer - Psychology - 1873
...same manner ; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible, because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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The Principles of Psychology, Volume 2

Herbert Spencer - Psychology - 1873
...same manner ; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible, because it can never imply a contradiction, and Ls conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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The Balance of Emotion and Intellect: An Essay Introductory to the Study of ...

Sir Charles Waldstein - Philosophy - 1878 - 213 pages
...nor is our evidence of them, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing (Relations of Ideas). The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible ; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness as if ever so conformable to reality.'1...
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