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Books Books 41 - 50 of 184 on Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained....  
" Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained in the same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because... "
Principles of Logic - Page 418
by George Hayward Joyce - 1916 - 431 pages
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What is Thought?: Or, The Problem of Philosophy by Way of a General ...

James Hutchison Stirling - Philosophy - 1900 - 423 pages
...same manner ; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible ; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is consceived by the mind with equal facility and distinctness, as if ever ftso conformable to...
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Hume

Thomas Henry Huxley - 1901 - 206 pages
...mind with the same facility and distinctness as if ever so conformable to reality. That the sun Witt not rise to-morrow, is no less intelligible a proposition,...contradiction, than the affirmation that it will rise. We should in vain, therefore, attempt to demonstrate its falsehood. Were it demonstratively false,...
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Enquiries Concerning the Human Understanding and Concerning the ..., Volume 921

David Hume - Ethics - 1902 - 371 pages
...mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to reality. That the\ atin will not rise to-morrow is no less intelligible a...contradiction than the affirmation, that it will rise. We should in vain, therefore, attempt to demonstrate its falsehood. Were it demonl stratively false,...
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The development of modern philosophy: with other lectures and essays

Robert Adamson - Philosophy, Modern - 1903 - 688 pages
...same manner ; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible, because it can never imply a contradiction. . . . Were it demonstratively false, it would imply a contradiction, and could never be distinctly...
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System der Rechts- und Wirtschaftsphilosophie, von dr. jr. Fritz ..., Volume 1

Fritz Berolzheimer - Knowledge, Theory of - 1904
...Treat. I, P. III, sect. l p. 372—375. ") Treat. I, P. III, sect. 1, 2. 7; Enqniry sect. IV (p. 23: „That the sun will not rise to-morrow is no less...contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise"l. ") Treat. I P. III sect. VII (p. 396, 894-399); P. II, sect. 6; Enqu. sect. 5, p. II. Alle...
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Descartes, Spinoza and the New Philosophy

James Iverach - 1904 - 245 pages
...before him the conception of the possible. The possible involves no contradiction. Just as Hume says : " The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness as if ever so conformable to reality....
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The metaphysics of nature

Carveth Read - Knowledge, Theory of - 1905 - 354 pages
...principle of Contradiction. For thus he contrasts such knowledge with matter of fact, the contrary of which can never imply a contradiction: " That the sun will...contradiction, than the affirmation that it will rise. We should in vain, therefore, attempt to demonstrate its falsehood. Were it demonstratively fake, it...
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The metaphysics of nature

Carveth Read - Knowledge, Theory of - 1905 - 354 pages
...principle of Contradiction. For thus he contrasts such knowledge with matter of fact, the contrary of which can never imply a contradiction : " That the sun will...no more contradiction, than the affirmation that it vntt rise. We should in vain, therefore, attempt to demonstrate its falsehood. Were it demonstratively...
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The Principles of Psychology, Volume 2

Herbert Spencer - Psychology - 1906
...same manner ; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible, because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding and Selections from A Treatise of ...

David Hume, Adam Smith - Ethics - 1907 - 267 pages
...same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible ; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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