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Books Books 61 - 70 of 103 on Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained....  
" Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained in the same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because... "
Principles of Logic - Page 418
by George Hayward Joyce - 1916 - 431 pages
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David Hume: Induction and scepticism

Stanley Tweyman - 1995 - 308 pages
...ascertained in the same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth ... of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction We should in vain, therefore, attempt to demonstrate its falsehood It may, therefore, be a subject...
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Twelve Great Philosophers: A Historical Introduction to Human Nature

Wayne P. Pomerleau - Philosophy - 1997 - 473 pages
...established by means of concrete experience and can never be rendered absolutely certain. As Hume puts it, The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction. Loosely speaking, we might claim to know that the Sun will rise tomorrow, on the basis of our inductive...
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Programming and Meta-Programming in Scheme: Edition en anglais

Jon Pearce - Computers - 1998 - 341 pages
...(unsafe-triangle n) (if (zero? n) 0 (+ n (unsafe-triangle (- n 1))))) 3.4.4. Mathematical Induction That the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible...contradiction than the affirmation, that it will rise. David Hume, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding A scientist verifies a theory by conducting...
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Looking Into the Seeds of Time: The Price of Modern Development

Y. S. Brenner - Business & Economics - 443 pages
...conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to reality. That the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible...contradiction than the affirmation that it will rise... It may, therefore, be subject worthy of curiosity, to inquire what is the nature of that evidence which...
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A History of Philosophy, Volume 5

Frederick Copleston - Philosophy - 1999 - 440 pages
...cannot deny that 2+2=4 without being involved in contradiction: the opposite is inconceivable. But 'the contrary of every matter of fact is still possible,...more contradiction than the affirmation that it will rise.'1 Hume does not mean that it is untrue to say that the sun will rise tomorrow: he means that...
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A History of Inverse Probability: From Thomas Bayes to Karl Pearson, 2nd edition

Andrew I. Dale - Mathematics - 1999 - 670 pages
...of the Inquiry concerning Human Understanding, the sentence "That the sun will not rise to morrow, is no less intelligible a proposition, and implies...contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise" And as a footnote to 6, "Of probability" , in the same essay, we have "... we must say, that it is...
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Early Responses to Hume's Metaphysical and Epistemological Writings: Volumes ...

James Fieser - Philosophy - 2005 - 750 pages
...same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction; and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness as if ever so [The original reads...
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Uncertain Decisions: Bridging Theory and Experiments

Luigi Luini - Business & Economics - 1999 - 341 pages
...propositions such as "all birds fly" or "the sun rises every morning." However, Hume (1748) argued that "... The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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Early Responses to Hume's Writings on Religion: 2 Volumes

James Fieser - Philosophy - 2005 - 817 pages
...experience, or to the experience of others. For as this gentleman observes in another part of his Essays, "The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction."18 And again he says, speaking of matter of fact, "there are no demonstrative arguments...
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Proportion: Science, Philosophy, Architecture

Richard Padovan - Architecture - 1999 - 388 pages
...thought, without reference to anything outside the mind, lint '77iaf the son in.// not rist tomorraw is no less intelligible a proposition, and implies no more contradiction, than the affirmation, thar it will rist.',7 Reason is thus absolute master in the realm of pure thought, and above all in...
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