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Books Books 71 - 80 of 105 on Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained....  
" Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained in the same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because... "
Principles of Logic - Page 418
by George Hayward Joyce - 1916 - 431 pages
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Early Responses to Hume's Metaphysical and Epistemological Writings: Volumes ...

James Fieser - Philosophy - 2005 - 750 pages
...other; and if we think of a wound, we can scarcely forbear reflecting on the pain which follows it. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible, because it never can imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness,...
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One-Parameter Semigroups for Linear Evolution Equations

Rainer Nagel - Mathematics - 2000 - 586 pages
This title gives an up-to-date account of the theory of one-parameter semi groups of linear evolution equations. It contains a systematic discussion of the spectral theory and ...
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Philosophy and Ordinary Language: The Bent and Genius of Our Tongue

Oswald Hanfling - Philosophy - 2003 - 265 pages
...such a reason, Confusion about this matter sometimes leads to misunderstanding of a passage in Hume: That the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible...contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise'.l This is sometimes taken as an expression of scepticism, but it is nothing of the sort: Hume...
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Philosophy and Ordinary Language: The Bent and Genius of Our Tongue

Oswald Hanfling - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2000 - 265 pages
...reason. Confusion about this matter sometimes leads to misunderstanding of a passage in Hume: 'Thai the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible...contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise'.1 This is sometimes taken as an expression of scepticism, but it is nothing of the sort: Hume...
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Social Science Quotations: Who Said What, When, and Where

David L. Sills, Robert King Merton - Social Science - 2000 - 437 pages
...darkness with which he is environed. The Stoic (1742) 1985:148. That the sun will not rise tomorrou' is no less intelligible a proposition and implies...contradiction than the affirmation that it will rise. We should in vain, therefore, attempt to demonstrate its falsehood. AM Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding...
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Hume’s Reflection on Religion

Miguel A. Badía Cabrera - History - 2001 - 328 pages
...existence, on the other hand, are known only by experience, and can be denied without self-contradiction. "That the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible...contradiction than the affirmation, that it will rise" (EHU, 25-26). Consequently matters of fact and existence, which are the subject matter of all sciences...
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Cultural Materialism: The Struggle for a Science of Culture

Marvin Harris - Social Science - 2001 - 381 pages
...and the mind never encounters any fundamental obstacle in the way of conceiving it to be possible. That the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible...contradiction than the affirmation that it will rise. We should in vain therefore attempt to demonstrate its falseness. (Hume 1955 [1748]:40) Observation...
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A Theory of Case-Based Decisions

Itzhak Gilboa, David Schmeidler - Business & Economics - 2001 - 199 pages
...Hume, explicit induction does not rely on sound logical foundations. Hume (1748, Section IV) writes: The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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The Study of Philosophy

S. Morris Engel - Philosophy - 2001 - 413 pages
...same manner, nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible, because it can never imply a contradiction and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness as if ever so conformable to reality....
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First Philosophy: Fundamental Problems and Readings in Philosophy

Andrew Bailey - Philosophy - 2002 - 966 pages
...same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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