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Books Books 91 - 100 of 101 on Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained....  
" Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained in the same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because... "
Principles of Logic - Page 418
by George Hayward Joyce - 1916 - 431 pages
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Knowledge: Critical Concepts, Volume 1

Nico Stehr, Reiner Grundmann - Philosophy - 2005 - 390 pages
...same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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The Spiritual Dimension: Religion, Philosophy and Human Value

John Cottingham - Philosophy - 2005 - 186 pages
...superior.' Alasdair Maclntyre, Dependent Rational Animals (London: Duckworth, 1999), pp. 1-2 and 7. 50 ' That the sun will not rise to-morrow is no less intelligible a proposition, and implies no more a contradiction, than the affirmation that it will rise.' David Hume, An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding...
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Hume's 'Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding': A Reader's Guide

Alan Bailey, Dan O'Brien - Philosophy - 2006 - 160 pages
...conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to reality. That the sun will not rise to-morrow is no less intelligible...contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise. (4.2 / 25-6) This means that if we wish to arrive at true beliefs about objects existing in the real...
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Philosophy, Crime, and Criminology

Bruce A. Arrigo, Christopher R. Williams - Social Science - 2006 - 304 pages
...disconcerting nature of the problem of induction is clearly expressed in one of Hume's best-known statements: "That the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible...contradiction than the affirmation that it will rise" (1748/1969, p. 197). If our expectations rely on the inductive principle, but its use cannot be logically...
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Theoretical Issues in Psychology: An Introduction

Sacha Bem, Huib Looren de Jong - Psychology - 2006 - 312 pages
...all the cases in the past. There is always room for scepticism, as the empiricist David Hume wrote: That the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible...contradiction than the affirmation, that it will rise. (1748/1963: section iv, 25-6, original emphasis) Hume's conclusion of his discussion of induction is...
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Chasing Reality: Strife Over Realism

Mario Bunge - Philosophy - 2006 - 342 pages
...necessary, then anything can happen. This is what Hume asserts in the most famous passage of his Enquiry: "The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness as if ever so conformable to reality....
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Hume's 'Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding': A Reader's Guide

Alan Bailey, Dan O'Brien - Philosophy - 2006 - 160 pages
...case even when we have compelling grounds for supposing that this contrary claim is, in fact, false. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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The Study of Philosophy

Angelika Soldan - Philosophy - 2007 - 457 pages
...conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness as if ever so conformable to reality. That the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible...contradiction than the affirmation that it will rise. We should in vain, therefore, attempt to demonstrate its falsehood. Were it demonstratively false,...
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Philosophical Inquiry: Classic and Contemporary Readings

Jonathan Eric Adler, Catherine Z. Elgin - Philosophy - 2007 - 896 pages
...same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. ilitarian morality. As the means of making the nearest approach to this ideal, utility would enjoi and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to...
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Hume: An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding: And Other Writings

Stephen Buckle - Philosophy - 2007 - 278 pages
...same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if 1 The distinction is clearly...
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