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Books Books 61 - 70 of 180 on Neither a borrower nor a lender be: For loan oft loses both itself and friend; And....  
" Neither a borrower nor a lender be: For loan oft loses both itself and friend; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all, — to thine own self be true; And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man. "
The Plays & Poems of Shakespeare: According to the Improved Text of Edmund ... - Page 31
by William Shakespeare, Edmond Malone - 1857
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Literary leaves, Volume 1

David Lester Richardson - History - 1840
...lesson that a courtier learns. Let us quote another specimen of his paternal admonitions. " Neither a borrower nor a lender be : For loan oft loses both...friend ; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.'' * Opinion, Polonius might have picked up this marvellous scrap of prudence in some petty tradesman's...
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The philosophy of Shakspere: extracted from his plays

William Shakespeare, Michael Henry Rankin - Drama - 1841 - 238 pages
...every man thine ear, but few thy voice; Take each man's censure,* but reserve thy judgment. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both...borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all:—to thine ownself be true; And it must follow, as the niyhl the day, Thou canst not then be false...
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The school reader: Fourth book. Containing instructions in the elementary ...

Charles Walton Sanders - Readers - 1842 - 304 pages
...But not expressed in fancy — rich, not gaudy ; For the apparel oft proclaims the man. 3. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be : For loan oft loses both...of husbandry. This above all. — To thine own self be true ; And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man. QUESTIONS....
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The Works of Shakespere, Volume 2

William Shakespeare, Barry Cornwall, John Ogden, Richard H. Horne - 1843
...the man ; And they in France, of the best rank and station, Are of a most select and generous chief in that. Neither a borrower nor a lender be : For...the edge of husbandry. This above all, — to thine ownself be true ; And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man....
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Knight's Cabinet edition of the works of William Shakspere

William Shakespeare - 1843
...proclaims the man ; And they in France of the best rank and station Are of a most select and generous chief in that.* Neither a borrower, nor a lender be : For...the edge of husbandry. This above all, — To thine ownself be true ; And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man....
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The works of Shakspere, revised from the best authorities: with a memoir and ...

William Shakespeare - 1843
...the man ; And they in France, of the best rank and station, Are of a most select and generous chief in that. Neither a borrower nor a lender be : For...the edge of husbandry. This above all, — to thine ownself be true ; And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man....
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Results of Reading

James Stamford Caldwell - Literature and morals - 1843 - 351 pages
...judgment. Costly thy habit, as thy purse can buy, But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy ; Neither a borrower nor a lender be, For loan oft loses both...of husbandry. This above all, — To thine own self be true, And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man.1 Make not...
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The works of William Shakespeare, the text formed from an entirely new ...

William Shakespeare - 1843
...in France, of the best rank and station, Are of a most select and generous chief in thati. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both...the edge of husbandry. This above all, — to thine ownself be true ; And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man....
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The Works of William Shakspeare: The Text Formed from an Intirely ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1843
...in France, of the best rank and station, Are of a most select and generous chief in that1. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both...the edge of husbandry. This above all, — to thine ownself be true ; And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man....
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The Plays and Poems of Shakespeare,: According to the Improved ..., Volume 14

William Shakespeare, Abraham John Valpy, Edmond Malone, John Boydell, Samuel Johnson - 1844
...quarrel ; but, being in, Bear it, that the opposed may beware of thee : Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice : Take each man's censure,2 but reserve...any man. Farewell ; my blessing season this in thee ! Lner. Most humbly do I take my leave, my lord. Po. The time invites you : go ; your servants tend....
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