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Books Books 51 - 60 of 87 on Great queen, what you command me to relate, Renews the sad remembrance of our fate.....  
" Great queen, what you command me to relate, Renews the sad remembrance of our fate. An empire from its old foundations rent, And... "
German Museum: Or Monthly Repository of the Literature of Germany, the North ... - Page 15
1800
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The Tatler: selected essays

1888 - 478 pages
...Myrmidonum, Dolopumve, aut duri miles Ulyssei, Temperet a lacrymis ? Visa. Ma. ii. 8. Such woes Not even the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses tell without a tear. I WAS awakened very early this morning by the distant crowing of a cock, which I thought had the finest...
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Poetical Quotations from Chaucer to Tennyson: With Copious ..., Volume 1873

Samuel Austin Allibone - Quotations, English - 1896 - 772 pages
...hills with pleasing shades are crown'd, And sleeps are sweeter on the silken ground. DRYDEN. keep, Now the latter watch of wasting night, And setting stars, to kindly rest invite. DRYDEN. Take you the reins, while I from cares remove And sleep within the chariot which I drove. DRYDEN....
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Shepp's Giant Library: Eight Great Books in a Single Volume, an Unrivalled ...

Daniel B. Shepp - Booksellers and bookselling - 1897 - 526 pages
...Trojans underwent ; A pop'lous city made a desert place ; All that I saw, and part of which 1 was ; Not ev'n the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses tell without a tear. 'Twas now the dead of night, when sleep repairs Our bodies worn with toils, our minds with cares, When...
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Virgil's Aeneid

Virgil - Aeneas (Legendary character) - 1909 - 432 pages
...the Trojans underwent; A peopled city made a desart place; All that I saw, and part of which I was : Not ev'n the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern...our woe, And Troy's disastrous end desire to know, I will restrain my tears, and briefly tell What in our last and fatal night befell. "By destiny compell'd,...
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The poetical works of John Dryden, Volume 1

John Dryden - Literary Criticism - 1909 - 1056 pages
...the Trojans underwent; A peopled city made a desart place ; All that I saw, and part of which I was: Not ev'n the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern...our woe, And Troy's disastrous end desire to know, I will restrain my tears, and briefly tell What in our last and fatal night befell. " By destiny compell'd,...
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Virgil's Æneid, Volume 13

Virgil - Aeneas (Legendary character) - 1909 - 432 pages
...the Trojans underwent; A peopled city made a desart place; All that I saw, and part of which I was: Not ev'n the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern...our woe, And Troy's disastrous end desire to know, I will restrain my tears, and briefly tell What in our last and fatal night befell. "By destiny compell'd,...
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The poetical works of John Dryden

John Dryden - 1909 - 1056 pages
...which I was: Not ev'n the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses tell without a tear. 10 And now the latter watch of wasting night, And setting...our woe, And Troy's disastrous end desire to know, I will restrain my tears, and briefly tell What in our hist and fatal night befell. " By destiny eompell'd,...
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The poetical works of John Dryden

John Dryden - 1909 - 1056 pages
...the Trojans underwent; A peopled city made a desart place ; All that I saw, and part of which I was: Not ev'n the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses tell without a tear. ю And now the latter watch of wasting night, And setting stars, to kindly rest invite ; But, since...
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The poetical works of John Dryden

John Dryden - 1909 - 1056 pages
...Trojans underwent; A peopled city made a deaart place; All that I saw, and part of which I was: Kot ev'n the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses tell without a tear. ю And now the latter watch of wasting night, And setting stars, to kindly rest invite; But, since...
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The American Antiquarian and Oriental Journal, Volume 11

Stephen Denison Peet, J. O. Kinnaman - America - 1880
...life, and measuring the time and momentum of thought, would be a long and difficult way. " Not even the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses tell without a tear." — Virgil. " Through such a train of woes if I should run, The day would sooner, than the tale be...
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