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Books Books 31 - 40 of 86 on Great queen, what you command me to relate, Renews the sad remembrance of our fate.....  Take our survey New!
" Great queen, what you command me to relate, Renews the sad remembrance of our fate. An empire from its old foundations rent, And... "
German Museum: Or Monthly Repository of the Literature of Germany, the North ... - Page 15
1800
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Virgil: The Eclogues, Volume 1

Virgil - Aeneas (Legendary character) - 1834
...Trojans underwent ; A peopled city made a desert place ; All that I saw, a part of which I was ; t Not ev'n the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses tell without a tear. It And now the latter watch of wasting night, And setting stars to kindly rest invite. But, since you...
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The rhetorical class book; or, The principles and practice of elocution ...

Henry Innes (teacher of elocution) - 1834
...the Trojans underwent; A poplous city made a desert place ; All that I saw, and part of which I was : Not ev'n the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses tell without a tear. * * * » * Hor«r. 'Twas now the dead of night, when sleep repairs Our bodies worn with toils, our...
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The Works of John Dryden: In Verse and Prose, with a Life, Volume 2

John Dryden, John Mitford - English literature - 1836
...saw and part of which I was ; Not e'en the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses hear, without a tear. And now the latter watch of wasting...rest invite, But, since you take such int'rest in our wo, And Troy's disastrous end desire to know, I will restrain my tears, and briefly tell What in our...
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The Works of John Dryden: In Verse and Prose, with a Life, Volume 2

John Dryden, John Mitford - 1844
...saw and part of which I was ; Not e'en the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses hear, without a tear. And now the latter watch of wasting...stars, to kindly rest invite. But, since you take such '.d,Vcst in our wo, And Troy's disastrous end desire to know, I will restrain my tears, and hriefly...
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The Works of John Dryden: In Verse and Prose, Volume 2

John Dryden, John Mitford - 1859
...the hardest of uur foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses hear, without a tear. And now the latter wateh of wasting night, And setting stars, to kindly rest invite. But. since you take such s.nt'rest in our wo, And Troy's disastrous end desire to know, I will restrain my tears, and hriefly...
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The anatomy of melancholy, by Democritus iunior

Robert Burton - 1850
...fere omnca aut evcraus, nut solo ˇequutas, aut in rudera fśdlssimč delectas, (jerbolliu. * Xot even the hardest of our foes could* hear, Nor stern Ulysses tell without a tear. • Ub. 1. ScprnaRlnt» olim legiones icrlptie dlcuntur ; qua« vire« hodle, Sic. P Polit. 1. 3. с....
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Richard Stanyhursts Übersetzung von Vergils Aeneide I-IV: ihr ..., Volume 13

Heinrich Leopold Schmidt - Literary Criticism - 1864 - 44 pages
...the Trojans underwent; A peopled city made a desert place ; All that I saw, and part of which I was ; Not ev'n the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern...our woe, And Troy's disastrous end desire to know, I will restrain my tears, and briefly tell, What in our last and fatal night befell." Jacques Delille...
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Beautiful thoughts from Latin authors, with Engl. transl., by C.T. Ramage

Craufurd Tait Ramage - 1864
...underwent; A peopled city made a desert place ; All that I saw, and part of which I was ; Not even the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses...our woe, And Troy's disastrous end desire to know, I will restrain my tears, and briefly tell What in our last and fatal night befell. THE VULGAR. JEn....
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The literary class book; or, Readings in English literature

Robert Joseph Sullivan - 1868
...the Trojans underwent; A pop'lous city made a desert place; All that I saw, and part of which I was; Not ev'n the hardest of our foes could hear, Nor stern Ulysses tell without a tear. Twas now the dead of night, when sleep repairs Horror. Our bodies worn with toils, our minds with cares,...
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The class and home-lesson book of English grammar

Charles Henry Walker Biggs - English language - 1871 - 72 pages
...sentences, and 2, analyse the simple sentences. I. EXAMPLE.—PBOM M'LEOD'S DBYDEN'S .ENEID OX VIBOIL. " And now the latter watch of wasting night, And setting...stars, to kindly rest invite ; But, since you take such interest in our woe, And Troy's disastrous end desire to know, I will restrain my tears and briefly...
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