Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 51 - 60 of 175 on The effect and it! Come to my woman's breasts, And take my milk for gall, you murdering....  
" The effect and it! Come to my woman's breasts, And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers, Wherever in your sightless substances You wait on nature's mischief! Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen knife see... "
Characters of Shakespeare's Plays - Page 41
by William Hazlitt - 1818 - 323 pages
Full view - About this book

The American Monthly Magazine, Volume 1

Nathaniel Parker Willis - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1829
...have known it Without a prompter. Macbeth exclaims, — Come thick nii*ht, And pall me in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen knife see not the wound it makes, Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry hold ! hold ! Shakspeare's blank verse is far superior...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works, Volume 1

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1831
...sightless substances Vou wait on nature's mischief! Come, thick night, And pall* thee in the dunnret smoke of hell ! That my keen knife' see not the wound it makes ; Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry, Hold, Hold .'—Great Glamis, worthy Caw dor!...
Full view - About this book

The Southern Review, Volume 8

1832
...sightless substances You wait on nature's mischief! Come, thick night. And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell! That my keen knife see not the wound it makes; Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry, Hold, Hold! Without going over the long, tissued,...
Full view - About this book

Specimens of the Table Talk of the Late Samuel Taylor Coleridge ...

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Critics - 1835
...Perhaps the true reading in Macbeth* is — blank " Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen knife see not the wound it makes, | Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark !" Act i., ac. 5. But, after all, may not the ultimate...
Full view - About this book

Specimens of the Table Talk of the Late Samuel Taylor Coleridge ..., Volume 2

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1835 - 372 pages
...strength. Perhaps the true reading in Macbeth * is * Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen knife see not the wound it makes, Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark ! Act I. sc. 5. U 4 — blank height of the dark — and...
Full view - About this book

Chromatography, Or, A Treatise on Colours and Pigments, and of Their Powers ...

George Field - Color - 1835 - 276 pages
...king, In dismal dance about the furnace blue. MILTON. Come, thick Night, , And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell ; That my keen knife see not the wound it makes, Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry, Hold! Hold! SHAKSPEARE, MACBETH. Richard yet lives,...
Full view - About this book

Select plays from Shakspeare; adapted for the use of schools and young ...

William Shakespeare - History - 1836
...sightless substances You wait on nature's mischief! Come, thick night, And pall5 thee in the dunnest smoke of hell! That my keen knife see not the wound it makes ; Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry, Hold, hold ! Great Glamis ! worthy Cawdor \ Enter...
Full view - About this book

Winter's tale. Comedy of errors. Macbeth. King John. King Richard II. King ...

William Shakespeare, Charles Symmons, John Payne Collier - 1836
...sightless substances You wait on nature's mischief ! Come, thick night, And pall3 thee in the dunnest smoke of hell ! That my keen knife see not the wound it makes ; Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark,4 To cry, Hold, hold ! Great Glamis ! worthy Cawdor ! Enter...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works and Poems of William Shakespeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare, Samuel Weller Singer, Charles Symmons - 1836
...signless substances You wait on nature's mii*chief! Come, thick night, And pall1 thee in the dunnest . He had none ; His flight was madness : When our actions do not, heaven pe«p through the blanket of the dark,2 To cry, Hold, hold ! Cawdor ! reat Glamis ! worthy Enter...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF