Life and Correspondence of Henry Knox: Major-general in the American Revolutionary Army (Google eBook)

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S.G. Drake, 1873 - United States - 160 pages
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Page 92 - Their creed is, that the property of the United States has been protected from the confiscation of Britain by the joint exertions of all, and therefore ought to be the common property of all; and he that attempts opposition to this creed, is an enemy to equity and justice, and ought to be swept from off the face of the earth.
Page 83 - Filling a glass, he turned to them and said, "with a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave of you ; I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy, as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.
Page 150 - The constitution has labored in Massachusetts exceedingly more than was expected. The opposition has not arisen from a consideration of the merits or demerits of the thing itself^ as a political machine, but from a deadly principle levelled at the existence of all government whatever. The principle of insurgency expanded, deriving fresh strength and life from the impunity with which the rebellion of last year was suffered to escape. It is a singular circumstance, that in Massachusetts the property,...
Page 147 - A judiciary to be appointed by the governor-general during good behaviour, but impeachable by the lower house, and triable by the senate. The laws passed by the general government to be obeyed by the local governments, and, if necessary, to be enforced by a body of armed men, to be kept for the purposes, which should be designated. All national objects to be designed and executed by the general government, without any reference to the local governments.
Page 147 - I mentioned, that men of reflection and principle were tired of the imbecilities of the present government ; but I did not point out any substitute. It would be prudent to form the plan of a new house, before we pull down the old one. The subject has not been sufficiently discussed as yet in public to decide precisely on tlie form of the edifice.
Page 110 - I cannot suffer you, however, to close your public service without uniting, with the satisfaction which must arise in your own mind from a conscious rectitude, my most perfect persuasion that you have deserved well of your country.
Page 147 - GovernorGeneral during good behavior, but inipeachable by the Lower House and triable by the Senate ; the laws passed by the general government to be obeyed by the local governments, and, if necessary, to be enforced by a body of armed men, to be kept for the purposes which should be designated ; all national objects to be designed and executed by the general government without any reference to the local governments.
Page 151 - ... opposition. A few, very few indeed, wellmeaning people are joined to them. The friends of the constitution in that State, without overrating their own importance, conceived that the decision of Massachusetts would most probably settle the fate of the proposition. They therefore proceeded most cautiously and wisely, debated every objection with the most guarded good nature and candor, but took no questions on the several paragraphs, and thereby prevented the establishment of parties. This conduct...
Page 101 - Her hair in front is craped at least a foot high, much in the form of a churn bottom upward, and topped off with a wire skeleton in the same form covered with black gauze, which hangs in streamers down her back. Her hair behind is in a large braid, turned up, and confined with a monstrous large crooked comb. She reminded me of the monstrous cap worn by the Marquis La Fayette's valet commonly called, on this account, the Marquis
Page 119 - Long will he be remembered as the ornament of every circle in which he moved, as the amiable and enlightened companion, the generous friend, the man of feeling and benevolence ; his conversation was animated and cheerful, and he imparted an interest to every subject that he touched. In his gayest moments he never lost sight of dignity ; he invited confidence, but repelled familiarity. His imagination was brilliant, his conceptions lofty ; and no man ever possessed the power of embodying his...

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