The antiquities and curiosities of the Exchequer (Google eBook)

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E. Stock, 1891 - Antiques & Collectibles - 230 pages
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Page 136 - Coffers) tooke their plott from an Aqueduct. That as water is derived from many springes to heades, and from heades guided into a pipe, and by that carried into the Cesterne of a greate house or pallace, where it is to bee expended accordinge to the necessitie and use of every office. Soe, this silver streame, growing out of divers natures, might bee drawne from its springes...
Page 120 - ... were narrow shafts of box, willow, or other hard wood, on which notches were cut to denote particular sums of money ; and by this primitive method the amounts paid into the Exchequer were duly checked. On the obverse surface of the shaft the principal numeral of the sum was cut in one bold notch. Then, on the reverse surface, were cut the subsidiary numerals of the sum required to be inscribed, with a suitable interval between each denomination. Thus, 1,000 was cut in one deep notch of the...
Page 165 - ... the Sheriff by throwing in sufficient pence out of the surplus in the Pyx to turn the scale. Thereupon the refined librate was put aside, endorsed with the name of the County to which it appertained, together with a certificate of the number of pence which had been required to make up the loss by Assay ; whereby it was established how many pence were to be deducted from every pound which the Farm . contained before it could be allowed as
Page 133 - ... counter-tallies, and warrants, representing the accountant's credit in the treasury. Then the calculator, rising in his place, prepares to make the moves of the game as they are dictated from the contents of the great roll. The sum of each separate entry of the farm of the county being announced, he leans over and arranges on the side farthest from him the amount quoted, in specie or in counters, within the appropriate columns. Next he sorts out the credit before him into heaps in the same columns...
Page 134 - And so the contest is slowly waged, the piles of silver, gold and metal counters, sticks, and scrolls, being marshalled, advanced, and swept off the board, just as the pieces or pawns of the real game would have been played, till the Account of the Farm is concluded, and the mimic warfare terminates in a truce between the parties for another six months at...
Page 164 - Dialogus, and is summarized in the following : ' Besides the Sheriff and the Master of Assays with his subordinate, two other Sheriffs, nominated by the Treasurer, were present at the ceremony as witnesses. Together, this party repaired to the furnace, whither the Assayer had preceded them to make the necessary preparations. Arrived there, the coffer containing the trial librate was once more emptied and counted afresh by the expert, the rest standing by and watching his operations. When counted,...
Page 25 - Bruges, and there were taken from him 14, 17s., for which he sued in the King's Court at Westminster at the beginning of August, in the thirty-first year, and then he saw the condition of the refectory of the Abbey, and saw the servants bringing in and out silver cups and spoons and mazers. So he...
Page 135 - Piperin is used for making heliotropin and sometimes as a substitute lor pepper. PIPE BOLLS. A name applied to the great or annual rolls of the English Exchequer, written for the treasurer. They are so called because of their resemblance to a pipe, or on account of the favorite comparison of the public treasury to a reservoir, into which every branch of revenue tlowed through these pipes. They were written by the treasurer's scribe, and controlled by the Chancellor's scribe. They contained a statement...
Page 5 - Now arrived Hugelin The chamberlain, who takes some money, Carries off as much as he wished To pay to his seneschals, To his caterers and marshals, But in his haste he forgets That he shuts not the chest.
Page 119 - ... more than 600 years ago. These rude memoranda were indeed invaluable auxiliaries of the hard-worked official staff of the Exchequer of Receipt. The high-born or well-todo, yet often illiterate, sheriff of the crown, who came before the barons with his profer during Easter term, had but to pay in his treasure and take an acknowledgment in the shape of a small piece of wood inscribed with a figure-writing intelligible at a glance to the meanest comprehension.

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