The Voltaic Cell: Its Construction and Its Capacity (Google eBook)

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Wiley, 1893 - Electric batteries - 562 pages
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Page i - In place of the term pole, I propose using that of electrode,* and I mean thereby that substance, or rather surface, whether of air, water, metal, or any other body, which bounds the extent of the decomposing matter in the direction of the electric current.
Page 260 - ... boilingpoint ; the salt, which is a nearly insoluble white powder, should be well washed in distilled water, and care should be taken to obtain it free from the mercuric sulphate (persulphate), the presence of which may be known by the mixture turning yellowish on the addition of water. The careful washing of the salt is a matter of essential importance, as the presence of any free acid, or of persulphate, produces a considerable change in the electromotive force of the cell.
Page ii - The anode is therefore that surface at which the electric current, according to our present expression, enters: it is the negative extremity of the decomposing body; is where oxygen, chlorine, acids, &c., are evolved; and is against or opposite the positive electrode. The cathode is that surface at which the current leaves the decomposing body, and is its positive extremity ; the combustible bodies, metals, alkalies, and bases, are evolved there, and it is in contact with the negative electrode.
Page 317 - ... soldered junctions, and with them to obtain the results. I now come to the special point which is the occasion of this communication. A few days ago I was investigating the effect of static charges communicated to the plates on the sensitive and insensitive states, and in the course of these experiments I found that if a Voss machine, not in any way connected with the cell or the electrometer, was worked in the room while the cell was in the insensitive state, the moment a spark passed between...
Page i - ... with two friends, and with their assistance and concurrence in framing them, I purpose henceforward using certain other terms, which I will now define. The poles, as they are usually called, are only the doors or ways by which the electric current passes into and out of the decomposing body (556.) ; and they of course, when in contact with that body, are the limits of its extent in the direction of the current.
Page i - ... and for the sake of greater precision of expression than I can otherwise obtain, I have deliberately considered the subject with two friends, and with their assistance and concurrence in framing them, I purpose henceforward using certain other terms, which I will now define. The poles, as they are usually called, are only the doors or ways by which the electric current passes into and out of the decomposing body...
Page 261 - ... wax. Contact with the mercury may be made by means of a platinum wire passing down a glass tube, cemented to the inside of the cell, and dipping below the surface of the mercury, or more conveniently by a small external glass...

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