A History of Egypt Under the Ptolemaic Dynasty (Google eBook)

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Methuen & Company, 1899 - Egypt - 261 pages
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Page 247 - And when the people saw what Paul had done, they lifted up their voices, saying in the speech of Lycaonia, The gods are come down to us in the likeness of men.
Page 106 - Troglodyte (Bedouin) and Ethiopic. . . . But having become master of all the country within the Euphrates, and of Cilicia and Pamphylia and Ionia and the Hellespont and Thrace, and of all the military forces and elephants in these countries, and having made the monarchs in all these places his subjects, he crossed the Euphrates, and having brought under him Mesopotamia and Babylonia and Susiana and Persis and Media, and all the rest as far as Bactriana ... he sent forces through the canals . . ."...
Page 214 - Egypt (and 213 power and wealth, which makes an alliance with them imply the command of large resources in men and money ; mutual hatred ; disregard of all ties of family and affection ; the dearest object fratricide such pictures of depravity as make any reasonable man pause and ask whether human nature had deserted these women, and the Hyrcanian tiger of the poet taken its place.
Page 158 - Damanhour. these days in every month, on which there shall be sacrifices and libations, and all the ceremonies customary at the other festivals [some words lost], and to keep a feast to Ptolemy, etc., yearly (also) in all the temples of the land from the first of Thoth for 5 days ; in which they shall wear garlands, and perform sacrifices, and the other usual honours ; and that the priests (...) shall be called priests of the God Epiphanes Eucharistos...
Page 114 - Gods according to the previous decree, viz. the ist and gth and 25th, and to the other supreme gods are performed yearly national feasts and solemn assemblies, there shall be kept yearly a national solemn assembly both in the temples and throughout all the land to king Ptolemy and queen Berenike, Benefactor Gods, on the day when the star of Isis rises, which is held in the sacred books to be the new year...
Page 155 - ... inundation of the Nile, but this he controlled by "having damned at many points the outlets of the streams" and having accomplished this strategic (and cosmogonic) deed, he marched against Lycopolis, a city of "impious men . . . who had done great harm to the temples and all the dwellers in Egypt...
Page 115 - Payni (95 days before New Year Day) and is an attempt to fix the calendar unalterably to the seasons as they were in that year, inconvenient though they would seem to be. It provides that an intercalary day be added, in every fourth year, to the five festivals of the gods at the end of the year, "in order that it may not occur that some of the national feasts kept in winter may come in time to be kept in summer ... as has formerly happened.
Page 153 - ... EPIPHANES EUCHARISTOS, the off" spring of King PTOLEMY (IV) and Queen " ARSINOE, the Gods PHILOPATORES, hath " given many benefactions, both to the " temples, and 10 "to those that dwell therein, and to all those " who are subject to his dominion, being a " " " God born of a god and goddess even like " HORUS, the son of Isis and OSIRIS, who " avenged his father OSIRIS ; 11 (2) " and towards the gods " being full of benevolent piety, hath dedicated to the temples revenues in money and...
Page 157 - Ptolemy, the avenger of Egypt, beside which shall stand the leading god of the temple, handing him the emblem of victory, which shall be fashioned [in the Egyptian] fashion;' and the priests shall pay homage to the images three times a day, and put upon them the sacred adornment (dress), and perform the other usual honours such as are given to the other gods in the Egyptian festivals ; and to establish for king Ptolemy, etc., a statue and golden shrine in each of the temples...
Page 106 - But having become master of all the country within the Euphrates, and of Cilicia and Pamphylia and Ionia and the Hellespont and Thrace, and of all the military forces and elephants in these countries, and having made the monarchs in all these places his subjects, he crossed the Euphrates, and having brought under him Mesopotamia and Babylonia and Susiana and Persis and Media, and all the rest as far as Bactriana ... he sent forces through the canals . . ." (here the text breaks off). Later in this...

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