The Tour of the World in Eighty Days (Google eBook)

Front Cover
National Book Company, 1887 - 320 pages
2 Reviews
  

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Thhis book is in very bad shape and needs to bew rescanned without thumbs and fingers on the pages. Needs higher dpi too it is a smsall book.

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I love this book! And the evidence of bookworms on the scanned pages (not fingers, as believed by another reviewer)only adds to the experience. One could easily read the text-only version, but this is far better, in my old-fashioned opinion. Also, I loved critiquing the 19th century viewpoint on many subjects, esp Mormons and Indians (both Eastern and American). And I find myself fascinated by the flow of Mr. Verne's 19th century English. I've clipped several passages which include interesting words and turns of phrase. Here's one: "It is seen that the aforementioned Fix was not wanting in a certain amount of self conceit." (page 41). All in all, a great way to read a classic book whilst living a modern lifestyle. 

Contents

I
5
II
12
III
17
IV
28
V
33
VI
38
VII
45
VIII
49
XX
156
XXI
166
XXII
178
XXIII
188
XXIV
198
XXV
207
XXVI
217
XXVII
225

IX
55
X
63
XI
71
XII
83
XIII
92
XIV
101
XV
111
XVI
121
XVII
129
XVIII
138
XIX
145
XXVIII
234
XXIX
246
XXX
257
XXXI
268
XXXII
277
XXXIII
284
XXXIV
296
XXXV
301
XXXVI
309
XXXVII
315

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 125 - Bengal was favourable to the steamer's progress. The Rangoon soon sighted the great Andaman, the principal one of the group of islands, which is distinguished by navigators at a great distance by the picturesque Saddle Peak Mountain, two thousand four hundred feet high. They kept pretty close to the coast. The savage Papuans of the island did not show themselves. They are beings in the lowest grade of humanity, but they have been wrongfully called cannibals. The panoramic development of this island...
Page 99 - What madness !" and now he repeated, " Why not, after all ? It is a chance, perhaps the only one, and with such brutes " At all events, Passepartout did not put his thought into any other shape, but he was not slow in sliding down, with the ease of a snake, on the lower branches of the tree, the end of which bent toward the ground. The hours were passing, and soon a few less sombre shades announced the approach of day.

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