The Oxford Handbook of Regulation

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Robert Baldwin, Martin Cave, Martin Lodge
OUP Oxford, Sep 9, 2010 - Political Science - 680 pages
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Regulation is often thought of as an activity that restricts behaviour and prevents the occurrence of certain undesirable activities, but the influence of regulation can also be enabling or facilitative, as when a market could potentially be chaotic if uncontrolled. This Handbook provides a clear and authoritative discussion of the major trends and issues in regulation over the last thirty years, together with an outline of prospective developments. It brings together contributions from leading scholars from a range of disciplines and countries. Each chapter offers a broad overview of key current issues and provides an analysis of different perspectives on those issues. Experiences in different jurisdictions and insights from various disciplines are drawn upon, and particular attention is paid to the challenges that are encountered when specific approaches are applied in practice. Contributors develop their own distinctive arguments relating to the central issues in regulation and apply scholarly rigour and clear writing to matters of high policy-relevance. The essays are original, accessible, and agenda-setting, and the Handbook will be essential reading both to students and researchers and to with regulatory and regulated professionals.

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About the author (2010)


Martin Cave is Professor and Director of the Centre for Management under Regulation at Warwick Business School. He has advised many economic regulators throughout the world.

Robert Baldwin is a Professor of Law at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He has published extensively on regulation, has wide consultative experience in regulation and is the Director of the LSE Short Course on Regulation.

Martin Lodge is Reader in Political Science and Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research and teaching interests are in the comparative study of Executive Government and Regulation.

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