Beyond Totalitarianism: Stalinism and Nazism Compared

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Cambridge University Press, 2009 - History - 536 pages
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In essays written jointly by specialists on Soviet and German history, the contributors to this book rethink and rework the nature of Stalinism and Nazism and establish a new methodology for viewing their histories that goes well beyond the now-outdated twentieth-century models of totalitarianism, ideology, and personality. Doing the labor of comparison gives us the means to ascertain the historicity of the two extraordinary regimes and the wreckage they have left. With the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union, scholars of Europe are no longer burdened with the political baggage that constricted research and conditioned interpretation and have access to hitherto closed archives. The time is right for a fresh look at the two gigantic dictatorships of the twentieth century and for a return to the original intent of thought on totalitarian regimes - understanding the intertwined trajectories of socialism and nationalism in European and global history.
  

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Review: Beyond Totalitarianism: Stalinism and Nazism Compared

User Review  - Heidi - Goodreads

Part of the class required reading. Not as biased as the other book, it still is overly dry. Read full review

Contents

After Totalitarianism Stalinism and Nazism
1
PART I GO VERNANCE
41
Reproductive Policies Gender Roles
87
PART II VIO LENCE
133
National
180
PART III SOCIALIZATION
231
On the Breaking and Making
266
The NaziSoviet War as a System
345
Stalins Russia in Nazi
396
Works Cited
443
Index 5
517
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Sheila Fitzpatrick, the Bernadotte E. Schmitt Distinguished Service Professor in Modern Russian History at the University of Chicago, is the author of many books on Soviet social, cultural, and political history, including The Russian Revolution, Stalin's Peasants, Everyday Stalinism, and, most recently, Tear off the Masks! Identity and Imposture in Twentieth-Century Russia (2005). With Robert Gellately, she edited Accusatory Practices. Denunciation in Modern European History, 1789-1989. A past president of AAASS, she is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Australian Academy of the Humanities, as well as a regular contributor to the London Review of Books. Her current research topics include displaced persons in Europe after the Second World War. In 2008-9, she will be a Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin.