La casa adormecida

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, 1995 - Juvenile Fiction - 32 pages
1 Review
A Spanish translation of the popular Napping House features captivating rhythmic text and humorous illustrations that will send children off to a giggling dreamland.

What people are saying - Write a review

funny book & great illustrations

User Review  - nclaudio - Overstock.com

Great book with rhyming even when translated to Spanish...Illustrations are captivating to our 5 and 6 year old Read full review

About the author (1995)

Audrey Wood was born in Sarasota Florida. When Wood was two, her family moved to Mexico to study art. Wood and her three sisters were tutored in music, dance, painting, and drama. She decided at a young age that she wanted to create children's picture books. Wood is one of four generations of artists in her family, and the only female artist. Wood began writing children's books seriously when her son was two years old. Her first book, 24 Robbers, was published in 1978. Wood and her husband, Don collaborate on many of Wood's picture books. The first book the two did together was called Moonflute.

Alma Flor Ada was born in 1938 in Cuba. She has authored several children's folktales including "Encaje de Piedra" which earned her the Marta Salotti Gold Medal, "The Gold Coin" which won the Christopher Award, and "Gathering the Sun" which received the Once Upon a World Award. "The Lizard and the Sun/La Lagartija y el Sol" won her a Gold Medal from the National Association of Parenting Publications, and she was awarded an Accolade from the American Folklore Association for "Mediopollito/Half-Chicken". Her title "Under the Royal Palms: A Childhood in Cuba" won the Pura Belpre Award. In addition to writing, she is a professor at the University of San Francisco.

Don Wood was was born and raised on a farm in the great Central Valley of California. His family raised peaches, sweet potatos, almonds, grapes, and oranges. By the time Wood was in the sixth grade, he had forty acres of potatos to take care of by himself. During the summer, he and his brothers worked twelve to sixteen hour shifts, seven days a week. They were paid wages and were expected to pay for their own clothes and entertainment, and eventually, college educations. Wood knew by the sixth grade that he wanted to be an artist. Wood attended the University of California at Santa Barbara and did graduate work in art at the California College of Arts and Crafts. He was illustrating magazines when his wife Audrey decided to try her hand at writing children's picture books. They collaborated together on Moonflute and Wood enjoyed it so much that he has been illustrating kids books ever since.

F. Isabel Campoy is the author of more than one hundred books of poetry, art, biography, and folklore for children including Rosa Raposa and Pio, Peep! , co-authored by Alma Flor Ada. She lives in the San Francisco Bay area.

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