Arabs in History

Front Cover
OUP Oxford, Mar 14, 2002 - History - 256 pages
9 Reviews
`Whoever lives in our country, speaks our language, is brought up in our culture and takes pride in our glory is one of us.' Thus ran a declaration of modern leaders of Arab states. But what exactly is an Arab, and what has been their place in the course of human history?In this well-established classic, Professor Lewis examines the key issues of Arab development - their identity, the national revival which cemented the creation of the Islamic state, and the social and economic pressures that destroyed the Arab kingdom and created the Islamic empire. He analyses the forces which contributed to that empire's eventual decline, and the effects of growing Western influence. Today, with the Arab world facing profound social and political challenges, it constitutesan essential introduction to the Arabs and their history.

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Review: The Arabs in History

User Review  - Bridget - Goodreads

I read the third edition, published in 1956. As a contemporary work of the times, an amazing piece of research. Toward the end of the book, he summarizes Arab Islamic culture in a way that I hadn't ... Read full review

Review: The Arabs in History

User Review  - Austin Wright - Goodreads

I say this with a lot of Lewis' work....that I seem to lose interest by the last few chapters....regardless, this is a great work for people who might get confused by a Middle East History that ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)


Bernard Lewis is Cleveland E. Dodge Professor Emeritus of Near Eastern Studies, and Long-Term Member of the Institute for Advance Study, Princeton University. He has published numerous books on the Middle East, including, The Assassins, Race and Slavery in the Middle East: A Historical Enquiry, and The Middle East.

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