Human Brain Anatomy in Computerized Images

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Oxford University Press, USA, Mar 24, 2005 - Medical - 540 pages
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Modern tomographic scans are revealing the structure of the human brain in unprecedented detail. This spectator progress, however, poses a critical problem for neuroscientists and practitioners of brain-related professions: how to find their way in the current tomographic images so as to identify a particular brain site, be it normal or damaged by disease? The problem is made all the more difficult by the large degree of individual neuroanatomical variation. Prepared by a leading expert in advanced brain-imaging techniques, this unique atlas is a guide to the localization of brain structures that illustrates the wide range of neuranatomical variation. It is based on the analysis of 29 normal brain obtained from three-dimensional reconstructions of magnetic resonance scans of living persons. It also provides 177 section (coronal, axial, and parasagital) of one of those brains so that the same structure presented in the section obtained in one incidence can be identified in the section of another incidence. An additional 209 sections of two incidences of two other brains with different overall configurations are included at the same incidences, so that readers can become familiar with the variability of standard images prompted by different skull shapes. Forty-six normal brains, segmented in to the major lobes, are also included. The atlas is based on a voxel-rendering technique developed in the author's laboratory that permits the reconstruction of the brain in three dimensions. The technique permits the identification of major sulci and gyri with about the same degree of precision that can be achieved at the autopsy table. The volume contains 50 pages of color illustrations. The Second Edition of this atlas offers entirely new images, all from new brain specimens. Like the first edition, it will prove to be an essential tool for neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuroradiologists, psychiatrists, and neuroscientists, as well as medical and neuroscience students.

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About the author (2005)


Hanna Damasio is Dana Dornsife Professor of Neuroscience and Director of the Dornsife Cognitive Neuroscience Imaging Center at the University of Southern California. She is also an adjunct professor at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California. Until 2005 she was the Distinguished Professor of Neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, where she directed the Human Neuroanatomy and Neuroimaging Laboratory. Using computerized tomography and magnetic resonance scanning, she developed methods of investigating human brain structure and studied functions such as language, memory, and emotion, using both the lesion method and functional neuroimaging. She is the author of numerous scientific publications and of the award-winning Lesion Analysis in Neuropsychology (Oxford University Press), which has been used worldwide in brain-imaging work. Damasio is a Fellor of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Neurological Association. She recently shared the Signoret Prize in cognitive neuroscience with Antonio Damasio for their pioneering work in social cognition. She holds honorary doctorates from the Universities of Lisbon and Aachen.

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