Wall Street: A History, Updated Edition

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Oxford University Press, Oct 18, 2012 - Business & Economics - 528 pages
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Originally published in 1997 and revised in 2004, Charles Geisst's Wall Street: A History remains the most definitive take on how a small, concentrated pocket of lower Manhattan came to have such enormous influence in national and world affairs. This timely new edition will contain two new chapters, picking up after the fall of Enron and reflecting on the recent events of the global financial crisis. The first will cover the events precipitating the recent financial meltdown, and the second will cover the imminent policy changes of the Obama administration, which Geisst foresees will mark the end of an era of opposition to strong government, and the beginning of a period of state-dominated capitalism. Wall Street is at once the story of the street itself, from the days when the wall was merely a defensive barricade to the modern era in which it is the economic colossus of today, and an engaging economic history of the United States, and the role Wall Street played in making America the most powerful economy in the world, and the many challenges to that role it has faced in recent years.
  

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Contents

The Early Years 17901840
1
The Railroad and Civil War Eras 184070
29
The Robber Barons 187090
58
The Age of the Trusts 18801910
93
The Money Trust 18901920
118
The Booming Twenties 192029
146
Wall Street Meets the New Deal 193035
190
The Struggle Continues 193654
237
Bear Market 197081
292
Mergermania 198297
322
Running Out of Steam 19982003
369
The Cataclysm 200408
396
The Great Recession 2009
437
Notes
463
Bibliography
480
Index
491

Bull Market 195469
266

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About the author (2012)


Charles R. Geisst is Ambassador Charles A. Gargano Professor of Finance at Manhattan College, and the author of many books, including Collateral Damaged: The Marketing of Consumer Debt to America and Beggar-Thy-Neighbor: A History of Usury and Debt.

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