The Silmarillion

Front Cover
HarperCollins, 1999 - Middle Earth (Imaginary place) - 365 pages
38 Reviews

Designed to take fans of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings deeper into the myths and legends of Middle-earth

The Silmarillion is an account of the Elder Days, of the First Age of Tolkien s world. It is the ancient drama to which the characters in The Lord of the Rings look back, and in whose events some of them such as Elrond and Galadriel took part. The tales of The Silmarillion are set in an age when Morgoth, the first Dark Lord, dwelt in Middle-Earth, and the High Elves made war upon him for the recovery of the Silmarils, the jewels containing the pure light of Valinor.

Included in the book are several shorter works. The Ainulindale is a myth of the Creation and in the Valaquenta the nature and powers of each of the gods is described. The Akallabeth recounts the downfall of the great island kingdom of Numenor at the end of the Second Age and Of the Rings of Power tells of the great events at the end of the Third Age, as narrated in The Lord of the Rings.

This pivotal work features the revised, corrected text and includes, by way of an introduction, a fascinating letter written by Tolkien in 1951 in which he gives a full explanation of how he conceived the early Ages of Middle-earth.

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Plot is marvelous... - Flipkart
The story telling is ok... - Flipkart
But beware, this is just an ending, not the end. - Flipkart

Review: The Silmarillion (Middle-Earth Universe)

User Review  - Werner - Goodreads

Note, July 1, 2014: I edited this review just now to correct a typo; I'd written "Gondor" when I meant "Gondolin" in one place. (Pretty big geographical and chronological difference, despite the ... Read full review

Double delight for Middle Earth History Lovers - Book & Service

User Review  - Suman Ghosh - Flipkart

Those who have already read or reading the Hobbit & LoTR series; this book should definitely be a 'Must buy'. As this books will take you back to the time when the background of the ring and the ... Read full review

About the author (1999)

A writer of fantasies, Tolkien, a professor of language and literature at Oxford University, was always intrigued by early English and the imaginative use of language. In his greatest story, the trilogy The Lord of the Rings (1954--56), Tolkien invented a language with vocabulary, grammar, syntax, even poetry of its own. Though readers have created various possible allegorical interpretations, Tolkien has said: "It is not about anything but itself. (Certainly it has no allegorical intentions, general, particular or topical, moral, religious or political.)" In The Adventures of Tom Bombadil (1962), Tolkien tells the story of the "master of wood, water, and hill," a jolly teller of tales and singer of songs, one of the multitude of characters in his romance, saga, epic, or fairy tales about his country of the Hobbits. Tolkien was also a formidable medieval scholar, as evidenced by his work, Beowulf: The Monster and the Critics (1936) and his edition of Anciene Wisse: English Text of the Anciene Riwle. Among his works published posthumously, are The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún and The Fall of Arthur, which was edited by his son, Christopher. In 2013, his title, The Hobbit (Movie Tie-In) made The New York Times Best Seller List.

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