Libraries in the Ancient World

Front Cover
Yale University Press, 2001 - History - 177 pages
11 Reviews
This delightful book tells the story of ancient libraries from their very beginnings, when 'books' were clay tablets and writing was a new phenomenon. Renowned classicist Lionel Casson takes us on a lively tour, from the royal libraries of the most ancient Near East, through the private and public libraries of Greece and Rome, down to the first Christian monastic libraries. To the founders of the first public libraries of the Greek world goes the credit for creating the prototype of today's library buildings and the science of organising books in them. Casson recounts the development of ancient library buildings, systems, holdings, and patrons, addressing questions on a wide variety of topics, such as: What was the connection between the rise in eduction and literacy and the growth of libraries?; Who contributed to the early development of public libraries, especially the great library at Alexandria?; What did ancient libraries include in their holdings?; How did ancient libraries acquire books?; What was the nature of publishing in the Greek and Roman world?; How did differnt types of users (royalty, scholars, religious figures) and different kinds of 'books' (tablets, scrolls, co

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Review: Libraries in the Ancient World

User Review  - Valeria Pugiotto - Goodreads

Interesting overview of thE history of libraries. It is really just an introduction on the issue. Read full review

Review: Libraries in the Ancient World

User Review  - Gary Bodine - Goodreads

Covers what you would expect. Well written. Some very nice pics. Read full review

About the author (2001)

Lionel Casson, professor emeritus of classics at New York University has written many books on ancient maritime history and ancient travel.

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