Bram Stoker and the Man Who Was Dracula

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Da Capo Press, 2002 - Biography & Autobiography - 381 pages
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"What a splendid subject to sink one's teeth into," raved the Washington Post. Here was a six-foot-two Irishman with a red beard—a Victorian family man, a spirited debater, and the author of novels and short stories largely forgotten today. All, of course, except for Dracula, which has enjoyed countless stage and screen incarnations and haunted the dreams of many generations. Bram Stoker lived at the very center of late-Victorian social and artistic life and numbered among his friends Oscar Wilde, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, James Whistler, William Gladstone, and Alfred Lord Tennyson. But it was his relationship with the mesmerizing, domineering actor Henry Irving that may have played the most crucial role in Stoker's life—a real-life monster who ultimately led to Stoker's most famous creation. In this book that the Baltimore Sun called "superb," Barbara Belford draws on unpublished archival material to reveal the links between the reticent author's life, his vampire tale, and the political, occult, cultural, and sexual background of the 1890s.
  

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Contents

Prologue
3
The Dreamer
13
Trinity Man
29
Drama Critic
48
Henry Irving
70
The Lyceum
91
First Nights
107
The Beefsteak Room
123
The Occult
211
Cruden Bay
233
Shaws Dilemma
251
Dracula Debuts
269
Farewells
289
The Last Wave
309
Epilogue
325
Acknowledgments
333

America
146
Mephistopheles
173
T1e Bloody Play
193
Selected Bibliography
359
Photographic and Illustration Credits
377
Copyright

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Dracula

Limited preview - 2005

About the author (2002)

Barbara Belford has written several biographies on Victorian literary figures, including Violet Hunt and Oscar Wilde. A professor emeritus at Columbia University, she lives in New York City.

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